typography

Students: Use Good Fonts Well.

As a design student, I’m sure you’ve opened up FontBook or the InDesign font menu and scrolled all the way down to Zapfino before realizing that none of the fonts on your computer quite match the fluffy type visions in your mind. So then you head over to a wretched site like dafont.com, only to be confronted with an infinite number of terrible choices. What do you do next?


source: http://fuckyeahtypefacedesign.tumblr.com/post/61475663645/theyre-plume-crazy

type design content in graphic design programme

long time reader, first time member and poster.

i teach graphic design and typography at a community college in southern ontario (carl dair's hometown, in fact). we are in the process of revising our curriculum and i have been tasked with doing some research into the type design component of our curriculum. i thought the folks on this forum would have some valuable and usable input into our process.

when i was at design school in the late 1980s, we had one minor type design project as part of our larger type design course (15 hours per week). but i wish that i had had more.

so, my questions are :
how much type design is appropriate/useful in a three-year graphic design diploma?
are there specific types of projects that you have found helpful in your own experience?

thanks

Using the new MacBook Pro 13" Retina at a "scaled" resolution

Hi,
I'm not a type designer but I like reading and writing on my laptop and, as a consequence, I like good typography on screen. I need to buy a new laptop and I'm thinking about the brand new MacBook Pro 13" Retina.

As you know, this computer has an effective workspace of 1280x800, smaller than MacBook Air's 1440x900, but it is possible to set display preferences to get a larger workspace: 1440x900 or 1680x1050 (so-called scaled resolutions).

What happens, in your experience, when the resolution is set at a value other than ideal/retina? Do scaled resolutions impact on font/image sharpness, cpu performance, battery life, etc.? I love the retina display, but a 1280x800 workspace is just too small for my needs, so I plan to use the laptop always at 1440x900.

Thank you
Manosk

Using the new MacBook Pro 13" Retina at a "scaled" resolution

Hi,
I'm not a type designer but I like reading and writing on my laptop and, as a consequence, I like good typography on screen. I need to buy a new laptop and I'm thinking about the brand new MacBook Pro 13" Retina.

As you know, this computer has an effective workspace of 1280x800, smaller than MacBook Air's 1440x900, but it is possible to set display preferences to get a larger workspace: 1440x900 or 1680x1050 (so-called scaled resolutions).

What happens, in your experience, when the resolution is set at a value other than ideal/retina? Do scaled resolutions impact on font/image sharpness, cpu performance, battery life, etc.? I love the retina display, but a 1280x800 workspace is just too small for my needs, so I plan to use the laptop always at 1440x900.

Thank you
Manosk

Troubles with html entities referred to specific glyphs (HTML, FontLab)

Forums: 

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

Troubles with html entities referred to specific glyphs (HTML, FontLab)

Forums: 

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

What is the future of Type Specimens? Are they still used or is it a dying art?

What is the future of Type specimens? are people still designing type specimens to go in emails or to be delivered on the door step? Whats the future of Printed Type specimens? are they of any use to type setters any more?

What is the future of Type Specimens? Are they still used or is it a dying art?

What is the future of Type specimens? are people still designing type specimens to go in emails or to be delivered on the door step? Whats the future of Printed Type specimens? are they of any use to type setters any more?

Typography gift wrap paper

Forums: 

Typography gift wrap paper

We asked ourselves: Why not use figures themselves to design wrapping paper for your Advent calendar?
No sooner said than done—now available: Typographic wrapping paper for your Advent Calender.

Your gifts don’t need tiny boxes, the wrapping paper offers more amount for taller and other shaped presents (for e.g. wine, apples, tangerines … ). Additional labeling isn’t required for your Advent calender.

a discussion on Typographic 'Niceties'

Hey! this is my first post! I have already searched to find a specific discussion on typographic 'Niceties' however came up a bit short. Everyone knows typography is one of the designer's core tools. The designer uses type to communicate appropriately, to suggest a mood and a character and to contribute to page and layout dynamics, for both printed and screen based formats such as a tablet or smart phone. its obvious understanding the rules and key facts of typographic detailing will create better communication with the read/viewer.

Good typography should be invisible, yet typography should grab the reader's attention using imaginative solutions.

Looking for a good typeface for a Soul Food place

Forums: 

I'm designing for a take out Soul Food place, but with a healthier twist.
The restaurant will have a graffiti wall, so there's an 'urban' element to it (I hate that word!)

I could use some advice on:
1. A font that could serve as a logo/wordmark
2. Some supporting faces for menus and such.

I'm trying to steer clear of anything too cliche (and offensive).

Any help is much appreciated.

"Heart & Mind" custom lettering

Hey guys I've been working on this custom lettering project. What do you guys think? Is the composition balanced? Is this too busy? Your suggestions & constructive criticism would be much appreciated!

It's inspired by this quote... "Wealth is of the heart and mind, not the pocket" by Pharrell.

Thanks,
- Joseph
www.josephle.net

Has late 20th-century technology had a positive or negative impact on the proliferation of Typefaces?

I'm currently working on a thesis that discusses the impact of late twentieth-century technology on the proliferation of typefaces. It would be a great help if you would comment your opinion whether type design programmes, such as Opentype have had a positive or negative impact on the quality of typefaces designed over the past few years.

Vintage Hand Lettering Signs in OPorto

Hello all,

I’m currently looking for any information about vintage hand lettering signage in the city of OPorto in Portugal. I know it’s a difficult subject to find information about, but anyone who knows something about it, please let me know. Also, any info about the history of hand lettering signs would be really helpful. Thanks to everybody!!!

Best,
Ricardo C.

Support New Type Design Project

Forums: 

Hello all! I recently launched a new font design project on Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/59648831/uniform-a-revolutionary-new...

The font is a geometric sans serif type family, but what makes it unique is that the condensed weights are straight-sided, not squished ovals like all other geometric type families out there.

Please pass the word along to your designer/type loving friends! I really want to be able to create this cool new typeface but without the funding there is no way I will have the free time to work on it.

Thanks!

Richard Miller
Miller Type Foundry

Cyrillic (Russian) ideal number of characters per line

Hi Typophiles,

I'm a publisher and designer and need to establish good type design parameters for Russian books. I don't speak Russian and therefore can't come up with settings that Russian readers would consider ideal for sustained reading. For English text and the usual text faces, the ideal number of characters (including spaces and punctuation) is about 67 per line. Has anyone heard of an ideal number for Russian? Grateful for any lead. :)

type help

Forums: 

Hi!
I'm a student in college and I'm trying to figure what kinds of fonts I could use with this image.
I want to use three or two fonts that compliment this image. Im going for a 1950 look.
Thank you
any advice would be greatly appreciated!