typography

Rockport Publishers would like to publish your best typographic work ranging from classic to expressive applications—in all media—in their upcoming book, Design Elements: Choosing and Using Type. Select projects will be presented in this full-color, 160-page publication.

To download the official call for entries, please go to:
http://www.kristincullen.com/rockport.entries.pdf

The deadline for submissions is February 25, 2011.

Questions? Email author Kristin Cullen:
contact@kristincullen.com

Hello,
I wonder if anyone knows what the font is that? Help would be appreciated, thanks for your time!

In his book The Elements of Typographic Style, Robert Bringhurst sets forth what he considers to the be the ideal for setting text. He states:

- 45 to 75 characters line length (measure); specifically 66 including spaces; Single Column
- 40 to 50 characters; multi-column
- 85 to 90 characters; discontinuous text; generous leading
- 40 characters (minimum); justified
- 12 to 15 characters; marginal notes; English

He also discusses the ideal page to great detail on pp. 171–176.

I'm hoping to find other authors who've written down their ideals. What have you found as you've read? Would you share your findings? Even just the books and page numbers would be helpful.

Thanks!

There is a job opening for a Font Administrator at the Penguin Group USA, based in New York. Below is a link to the information on their website and an overview of the requirements:

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pages/aboutus/jobopportunities.html#job05

We are currently seeking a Font Administrator to support the design, marketing and managing editorial communities throughout the company by managing the processes for procurement, accessing and archiving all licensed fonts.

Specifically, the Font Administrator:

1. Negotiates agreements and interacts with our contracts department to ensure their compliance with our requirements.
2. Uploads and activates fonts on our corporate server and grants access as per the licensing agreements.

dtw's picture

Amusing icon?

If you put "Typography" at the head of your list of interests in Facebook, it generates this icon:

... the line break makes me chuckle every time I see it!

Hello,

I am currently designing a poster for a play which is set in 1832 London (pre-victorian period).

Does anyones know of any interesting and accessible typefaces I could use. I have already experimented some standards such as Baskerville, Garamond, Caslon and Plantin. I'm looking for more of an interesting typeface then the ones mentioned – more decorative and expressive if poss.

Any ideas???

Thanks, James

Howdy Typophiles!

In my Indesign document I have a page of images that are numbered and would like to have a list of captions with corresponding numbers. Some of the images will share the same captions so I'd like to have two to three numbers listed with commas separating them I'd like the numbers to be right justified :

Here is a sample:
Numbered List Example

hello,
i would be very glad if you have a recomendation for an arabic font that will suite to the other hebrew (progtextGOLD by Fontype) and english font (ST. Ryde by Sascha Timplan).
(macintosh offcourse).

Hey everyone, anybody know what this face is?

Hey all.

I am a new font designer (though not new to the art of typography) and I have recently finished creating my first completed font. It's a TrueType font. It's a highly original and stylish display type of font.

Anyway, I was thinking I was gonna try to make some money with it, and was wondering if anyone out there could offer some guidance and advice. Anything I should know about finding and dealing with a distributor? Do I need to make them sign something to keep from getting ripped off if they prove to be scandalous? (I'm always suspicious I guess)

I'd rather not have to market it myself even if I had my own website, setting up a shopping cart system etc..

Thanks in advance.

Hey all.

I am a new font designer (though not new to the art of typography) and I have recently finished creating my first completed font. It's a TrueType font. It's a highly original and stylish display type of font.

Anyway, I was thinking I was gonna try to make some money with it, and was wondering if anyone out there could offer some guidance and advice. Anything I should know about finding and working with a distributor? Do I need to make them sign something to keep from getting ripped off if they prove to be scandalous? (I'm always suspicious I guess)

I'd rather not have to market it myself even if I had my own website, setting up a shopping cart system etc..

Thanks in advance.

Our "happy tyographic families" game is available in english!
74 cards to understand, learn or revise typography with fun and with friends.
Presented in a plexiglass box.
Available on: http://www.editions205.fr
Buy it for Christmas. 10 € only!

Hi all,

I am working on a greeting card for a women's non-profit
organization and the theme is about peace, hope, faith, etc.
for the holidays and I am creating the words to be the shape
of a gift box, so I am trying to decide what kind of typefaces
I should look for. There is one called Lobster I like and others
such as Rosewood fill and Mrs. Eaves Bold. I have other slab
serifs and a few scripts, but nothing jumps out at me.

Would any of you have some suggestions? Thanks!!

bonnie

Hi there, i am currently in my third year at university studying graphic design and have recently started my dissertation.

I have decided on an area of which i would like to focus on however the subject area has been covered before and continues to be discussed in the design industry of late.

I would like to base my dissertation on print and pixel and where the two are heading. However i am really struggling on pin pointing one aspect within such a large subject (help?). For me print publishing will always appeal to me, the aesthetic value of a well designed publication is what print is all about. Its why I love what i do.

Now i have discussed and brainstormed the subject with my tutor. But if anyone can provide me with further advice then it would be greatly appreciated.

We just released the second in our series "The Ten Commandments of George Lois." The quotation reads The creative act, the defeat of habit by originality, overcomes everything. When I first approached George about collaborating, this was his immediate suggestion and remains one of his more celebrated statements.

My favorite quote of his, "Great ideas can't be tested. Only mediocre ideas can be tested" was the first release in the series.

A portion of the proceeds from sales of this shirt will benefit the Herschel Levit scholarship fund at Pratt Institute, Mr. Lois' alma mater.

Bruichladdich is a small sophsicated distillery that produces single islay malt whisky in Scotland. I have always enjoyed the typography treatments on almost all of the packaging design they have in my local liqour store. I wonder who designed the fun image & text on those packaging designs. If anyone know, please let me know!

Images are attached below.

I'm working on a project about design by committee / consensus and I really need some help with it. Essentially the idea is to make a book with all the decisions about its design made within this forum. The aesthetics of the book - it's size, format, layout, typeface etc will all decided by the consensus in here.

Firstly, what do people think about the size of the book should be? And in terms of the title, I have two starting points - 'A Camel is a Horse Designed by Committee' and 'Too Many Cooks'.

I'd really appreciate any comments and suggestions on this project.

Thanks

The "happy typographic families" is available!
Learn, understand, revise typography and its families with fun and with friends!
74 cards 5,8 x 9,3 cm in a plexiglass box.
60 fonts from the most famous foundries are presented.
In French or in English.
Published by Éditions Deux-Cent-Cinq: http://www.editions205.fr



It's a really "serious" game to understand, learn or revise typography and families.
You can play with friends (and even with your children, I played with my children and they liked it!) like with a "happy families" game.

Hey all,

Long time fan, first time poster. My name is Gus Wezerek. I'm a visual journalism student at Northwestern University. For one of my classes I'm writing an paper about contemporary gravestone typography. I've seen the thread here with the man who was soliciting help with a relative's tombstone design, but the paper is a bit too broad for his case.

Would anyone be willing to chat on the phone or email/point me in promising directions? I'm just looking for ideas about what makes (or you think would make) a good face for stone, special cases of gravestone typography or really anything you guys know or would be willing to speak about on the topic.

I've launched 3 new limited edition prints today, 'Dreams',
'Stars' and 'So Much To Do'. I'm really pleased how they
turned out. I'm attaching a few images. More details here:

www.seblester.co.uk

I've also had a major website update with new typographic
commissions for clients including Cadbury, Macy's and Liberty.

http://seblester.co.uk/type_lettering.php

Cheers,

Seb Lester

smylek's picture

Typographic logo

Hello,

I was working on my typography skills and have made Mining logo

What do you thing guys?

TYPOPASSAGE VIENNA
Design Micro Museum With and About Lettering
MuseumsQuarter Vienna / Gangway between square 1 and square 2

presents:

WELCOMETO.AS (Lausanne / Davis, California)

Opening reception: November 26, 2010 // 6 p.m.
Ongoing until March 2011

The TYPOPASSAGE Vienna is a unique, innovative museum project, curated by design studio bauer – konzept & gestaltung.

I've been working on a poster for a client and he totally hates it. What changes do people suggest I make to the design?

I've been working on a poster for a client and he totally hates it. What changes do people suggest I make to the design?

Hey Typophiles,

I'm a software developer working on an application that requires precise font rendering and I'm having trouble doing the calculations correctly.

Here's an example:

A user selects 36 point Helvetica as their font. How far down, in pixels, is the baseline?

Here's my calculation:

12pt is 16px, therefore 1px = 4/3pt.

36pt * 4/3 = 48 pixels

The baseline, per a book I have, "sits one-third the point size up from the bottom", so the baseline in this example would be at 32px.

32px, however, is smaller than the height in pixels of a capital A in 36 point font, which means the top of the A gets chopped off when rendered, so something is off.

What am I doing wrong?

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