OT

I'm wondering if it's possible to script any advanced features. Primarily I'm looking to solve a specific problem, but more generally I'm curious if more can be done with OT scripting than the standard "sub" script to replace one glyph with an other.

I'm tired of people over-hyphens so I wanted to script a fix for that, so in the standard ligatures I put the following code:
sub comma hyphen by comma_endash;

This replaces the comma followed by a hyphen with a ligature glyph where I have a comma followed by a line which is in between the hyphen and the en dash in length, which is more appropriate for denoting prices ($50,–).

Hello, i am new to OT features and everything that that means. I need to know if the letter I just typed is the first letter of a 'paragraph', and by so, make a sustitution. Is that possible? Anyone can guide me on some docs I should strongly read?

thank you for your comments,

hello folks, i have aquestion about ot scripting.

the font i'm working on is uppercase only and it has a lot of stylistic sets. of course i had to include lowercase glyphs too, but they just mirror the uppercase glyphs. however, for the alternative glyphs, i don't do uc and lc for each one of them, only the uc.

then i put only the uc glyphs in my stylistic sets classes and so for this to work with the lc as well, i'm doing a lookup that changes lowercase into uppercase before each substitution.

feature ss01 {
lookup ss01a { sub @lower by @upper; } ss01a;
lookup ss01b { sub @class_0 by @class_1; } ss01b; # they contain only uppercase
} ss01;

What would be the best/smart/easy way to transform an OT font that is fully featured and has several stylistic variants, into separate fonts for each feature, while still maintaining the kerning pairs etc.?

For example if an OT font has the standard latin characters + small caps + titling characters + alternates... to have the SC and Titling as standalone functional separate fonts.

What would be a good way to do do that?

Trying to control quotation marks when typesetting in inDesign:

I am trying to see if I can make quotation marks change automatically for different languages. For example if I select (in InDesign) the Language drop-down menu in the character palette > my English style quotes would transform into French guillemet quotes.

I see that just by having the standard repertoire of quotes does not mean easy implementation.

Otherwise how do French or German typographers call for a specific style of quotation mark?
- Do the desired marks have to be the default in the font file?

Any help to solve this mystery appreciated.

Michael Hernan

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