linux

“onlliinnee” is meant to be an opensource foss operating system. It
is meant to be free os and a linux based distro. What is meant to be
different and planned about onlliinnee is: only unique fonts,
software, development, a specific website home page on the browser,
startup screen connects to video website/s, related with model
railroad / railway, diecasting and ‘automation over internet
protocol’ (AOIP) especially Rail Model AOIP (RMAOIP) and is for Srila
Prabhupada: the always on eternal spiritual initiating and education
guru. Regarding any questions about this, send message to: identi.ca/
onlliinnee (after joining identi.ca)

www.onlliinnee.net

p.s.
For some "onlliinnee" gear (t-shirt, cap, jersey, time piece etc)
http://www.cafepress.com/onlliinnee

Hey everyone, it's been a while since I've posted, but I just realized that the sides of my nerdiness are overlapping, so it's a perfect opportunity to come on back!

I'm a proud owner of an OGD (Motorola DROID 1), and I've been rooted using CyanogenMod for about a year now. I've always been happy with it, but one day, I got fed up with the standard Droid fonts from Ascender Corps that comes packaged with Android.

I decided that I wanted other typefaces on my phone instead. Thus I replaced, the monospace font with DejaVu Sans Mono, and then switched that out for Terminus. I replaced Droid Serif with Linux Libertine G (just because I'm praying that one day, Android will support Graphite), and Droid Sans with Liberation Serif. I was so happy for such a long time.

When I put some Linux computer operating system Live CD distributions there is on some Verbose Mode viewing instructions. This allows the user to view the coding style text and not the Graphics Mode. I am not a font designer thus the question one here: Is the Verbose Mode font on the Linux distribution, circa 2011 a bitmap?

The Verbose Mode de facto gives the 'coder perception'. I am not a font coder, thus the question two here: Where is the Verbose Mode font and the coding style text that have font attributes (colour/italics/bold/lower/upper?) installed on the Linux operating system and is it easy to alter it to another font and the coding style text including the font attributes, circa 2011?

Hi!

I'm trying to gauge the importance of various collaboration scenarios... I hope you can spare a moment to consider the following scenario, and let me know your thoughts :-)

You publish a typeface family, "Alice," with 12 weights of roman and italic, covering full Latin, Cyrillic and Greek, under a 'libre' license. You publish all source files - FontLab VFBs including interpolation master outlines, OpenType feature files, and hinting files.

Does anyone know of an application for Linux that lets me use OpenType features? I'm thinking alternate forms, swashes, dicretionary ligatures.

I would like to migrate from using windows to linux, all the things I do I can do in Inkscape and Scribus, but the OT features would be a nice touch. I'm open to learning TeX or any other piece of software as long as it's usable.

Thanks

So this is a dabbler's question: what do y'all use to look at a font, as individual glyphs rather than as sample text? In particular, what do you do if you want an overview of say fleurons or similar odds-and-ends that don't show up easily in a standard sample text?

Does anyone know what this is? Thanks in advance.

Just found this, and thought I'd share it with everyone:

As designers, we sometimes forget that not everyone can see color the same way we do. I found a sweet app that allows you to simulate what color blindness does to your designs, whether it be interface design or the composition of a 4-color poster.

Here's an example of this page as viewed by someone with color blindness:

So this free app for Windows, Linux and Mac simulates how approximately 5% of all men will see your designs. It's a pretty cool app to add to your toolbox o' design stuff.

Anyway, the app is here http://colororacle.cartography.ch/

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