period

Hi,

I was curious as to what the script font under the WB logo is... I believe this title card was used in the '40s and '50s. Thanks

Greater Albion have jusst released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts:

Corsham:
Corsham was inspired by traditional stonemason's engraved lettering designs. Designed to be used alone, or in combination with our Corton family, ithas wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Four faces are offered-regular bold and black weights as well as a condensed form. All faces include a range of Opentype features, including ligatures and old-style numerals. The Corsham faces merge 'olde-worlde' charm with fun character, yet remaining clear and legible for text use.

Metropole:

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched 'Corton' a pair of display Roman small capitals faces.

Corton was inspired by the traditional lettering on a gravestone in an English village. While that might sound a rather solemn beginning, Corton has wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Two faces are offered-regular and titular. Between them they are ideal signage and display faces, merging 'olde-worlde' charm and fun character.

Corton is currently available through Myfonts, and is offered at a 35% introductory discount.

Hello! I've got a bit of dilemma on my hands. I'm currently the design editor of my university's student newspaper and for April 1st we're doing a joke issue with the theme "time warp." Each page will be from a certain period in time, with the first page being the beginning of the universe (the leading cover choice right now is a blank page) and the last page will the end of it. All pages will be themed, with some modeled after illuminated manuscripts and others 1920s newspapers, for example.

Now, I'm incredibly excited for this project, but the fonts have got me tripped up, specifically at the very beginning (cavemen and the discovery of fire) and the end (the far, far future). Anything after the start of movable type I'm fine with, obviously, because I can start to use Garamond and the like. But I'd like some ideas for the type before typography and into the future.

Dot

Small circular character used as a universal typographic element, principally in the role of a period, but also as part of an i or j. commas are often extensions of the period dot.

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