antique

chikajb's picture

Identify Font

Can anyone please identify this font?
It may be created from scratch but perhaps it is based on an existing font.
Any help would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
C.

The Republic Gothic series was among the last original wood type designs manufactured by Hamilton Manufacturing Co. It was first shown in Hamilton's New Gothic Faces in Wood Type (c. 1920). The design features a sans-serif style reminiscent of brush-formed letters popular with sign painters of the era.

hello everyone !! i'm new here. here's my first font basingstoke
Basingstoke is old fashioned typeface. inspired by old letterheads from the 19th century.
Find out more:
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/decade-typefoundry/basingstoke/
some preview:
http://www.behance.net/gallery/Basingstoke-Font/6639181





thanks !!

For Immediate Release:
Buffalo, NY USA- November 2, 2012

The Hamilton Wood Type Foundry announces two new fonts- HWT Antique Tuscan No. 9 and HWT Borders One…and a newly redesigned HWT Foundry site.

HWT Antique Tuscan No. 9 is a very condensed 19th century Tuscan style wood type design with a full character set and ligatures. This design was first shown by Wm H Page Co in 1859 and is the first digital version of this font to include a lowercase and extended European character set.

I saw this in a recently produced documentary photography book, being used to typeset quotes. It resembles handwriting in pen and ink, and is slightly blotchy in outline. I wonder if the spaced out characters are indicative to the font or whether they have been treated that way. The spacing makes it look modern, but the characters, especially the r and ascending/descending characters look old fashioned. Any clues?

I have a small graphic with an assortment of vintage typefaces right here:

http://graphicartisan.com/images/typefaces.jpg

Since they are so old I don't know if they are still in commercial print, but if anyone can tell me what they are (or were?) AND if there are any modern counterparts or look-alikes, that would be very helpful to me!

The font resembles Bernhard Modern or similar to Cochin, but it's not. The lowercase "g" seems to be unique – a clue to identifying this font. I already tried WhattheFont, but it failed to ID correctly. Unfortunately the JPEG compression artifacts make it difficult to ID. Anyone know this font?

Calabaça's picture

Numerals

Hi everyone!
Can someone please identify this numerals? If not, is there anything similar?

Thanks very much.


P22 Ruffcut is the newest addition to the Sherwood Collection of historical and period-based fonts by Ted Staunton. It is an antique wood type style that evokes the look and feel of type used in the design of poster-sized advertisements for circus, fairground and like events in the late 19th century. It is inspired by the memories of printing letterpress posters on an old cast-iron flatbed press where the oversized posters were usually composed directly on the bed of the press using mostly wood type as large as two feet high. The Ruffcut Set contains 2 styles, Plain and Woody for that more authentic look, in basic OpenType format. Ruffcut is optimal for a wide array of decorative uses including signage and posters.

What is the attached font?

It's from the letterpress lab at the university of oregon. It is 15 pica sans serif. It is not labeled, and it bares no foundry stamp or company insignia. It is most likely older than 1965, and could be as old as 1900.

It only exists in caps, although there are a few varying figures. (two types of A's, etc.) I tried to pick the figures with a similar grain pattern, the thought being that they would be of the same shipment of type.

It is possible that this font has not been digitized, but any help you guys can offer would be amazing!

Need some help Identifying this font:

http://pages.uoregon.edu/ppederso/woodsanssmaller.jpg

It's from the letterpress lab at the university of oregon. It is 15 pica sans serif. It is not labeled, and it bares no foundry stamp or company insignia. It is most likely older than 1965, and could be as old as 1900.

It only exists in caps, although there are a few varying figures. (two types of A's, etc.) I tried to pick the figures with a similar grain pattern, the thought being that they would be of the safe shipment of type.

It is possible that this font has not been digitized, but any help you guys can offer would be amazing!

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

I keep coming across these flourishes but can't seem to find where they originated. I assumed they were Dover clip art since they have a vintage or antique look, but cannot find them in any of their ornament books. Perhaps these flourishes are a font... Does anyone know where these specific ornaments are from?

Any one know what font this is? Was told it was used for a closed restaurant in Los Angeles...so we know the font exists...
any help would be appreciated...

thanks!
g

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