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sans serif

Agio (my first typeface)

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I was meaning to post this in late May / early June, but it's been a crazy summer. I graduated from the University of the Arts in May, and since then I've adjusted to my first full-time design job while taking some time to enjoy the little things in life.

Anyhow, I was fortunate enough to take Font Design Lab under the brilliant Mike Abbink last semester. I developed a Humanist sans serif titled Agio, and I'd be interested in any feedback or criticism that you wise Typophiles are able to impart. I'm not sure where to go from here...keep tweaking? Develop a bold weight? Discover the maddening thrill of kerning tables? I'd like to start on a new weight, but I'm sure there's room for improvement before I go ahead.

Chorus Typeface

Chorus Typeface
In music Chorus means a collective effort to sing in unison. Harmony and uniformity are it's key characteristics, the same has been integrated in this typeface. Every letterform has been designed so as to reflect harmony and uniformity when used together to form a letter,
sentence or paragraph.

Available for purchase on:
MyFonts.com
FontSpring.com









Font Family Suggestions

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I'm looking for a font family of san serif and sans which would look great for a scientific book design. It will be on string theory. Any suggestions would be great.

The fonts I like are:

http://usfonts.gestalten.com/t-star.html
https://ourtype.com/#/try/pro-fonts/fakt/
http://usfonts.gestalten.com/blender-pro.html

But I need to use a type with a sans serif and serif version rather than using two typefaces.

Light sans serif font

Hello,

I'm new here, I'm very happy to have found this site :)
I've been trying to find out what exactly is this typeface I've seen in a flash template: http://activeden.net/item/ultimate-creative-template/full_screen_preview...
The "John Smith Photographer" text's font is what I would like to know.
I've found similars, but not this one.
Thank you for your help in advance.
NR

Sans-serif, narrow, geometric, extra condensed typeface used for the masthead of a 1945 American West Coast magazine. Scanned.

A sans-serif, condensed, narrow, geometrical typeface that seems to be based on a narrow vertical rectangle used as a grid with a 7:2 ratio, perhaps.
It was used for the masthead of an architectural magazine, in 1946. Reminded me of Wim Crouwel's Hiroshima poster (1957) and I wonder if that particular typeface was in turn based on other typographic/visual trends at the time. Thank you!