American

Any ideas much appreciated!

I've always enjoyed both Bodoni and Scotch style faces. I wanted to introduce some ‘fashion sense’ into the ‘work horse’, and get something unique. I think there's some potential to make it into a text face, eventually expand it, but I wanted to get some feedback here first. I honestly have no idea what I'm doing, folks. It just sounded like a worthwhile idea to entertain.

I've been looking at Monticello quite a bit, and referencing a generic Bodoni for logic and proportion. For what it's worth.

What do y'all think of that |Q|? and
I realize the teardrop is missing from the |g|. Bear with me.
Thanks to raph for the Monticello Specimens.

I have searched for this font everywhere with no avail! The closest I have come is a condensed Akzidenz, DIN, Folio and Industria. None of these apart from Industria have an outline version like the posted image. Anyone out there who can identity this please!

The Spargo family of six typefaces has just released on Myfonts.com and on Fontspring.

Spargo is inspired by 20s and 30s American typefaces, often seen on share certificates and other securities. We thought it was time to bring a touch of transatlantic boom and ebullience to our portfolio of typefaces, not to mention a healthy dose of Roaring 20s spirit. Spargo is the result, offered in six all capitals display typefaces.

Here are speciments of the six faces...

Hello!

They always say that the AmericanAirlines and the Lufthansa logo use Helvetica. However, the "a" or the "r" don't look like any version of Helvetica, but are very similar to AG Book.

So, do they use (some version of) Helvetica or AG Book? (Please see samples attached.)

Thanks,

RG

I'm looking to ID the types used in "The Amazon an Madeira Rivers" (via the Library of Congress.) Both the title page and body text please. Images are attached as well.

I was looking at Nick Shinn's Scotch Modern and it looks very close to the body.

Thanks for all your help fellow typophiles.

Andrew

from Michael Adkins...

Just wondering if I could get some feedback on this new font. First: this font isn't trying to take itself too serious. It is a condensed tribute to the classic 1940s Captain America covers. Second: It fits in fine when bold, fill-up-the-space lettering is called for, and it works great for signage when you're trying to cram everything into a tight space (DOT numbers and GVW's come to mind.) In all other venues, its usability remains to be seen.

Really, it's a work of passion, so the question of overall functionality also remains to be seen. Still, people are downloading the freebie at a hot pace, so there may be life for it beyond the funny books and sign shops. Thoughts?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

I am doing a project and im looking to see if anyone has a very close/exact match to these fonts. Thanks in advance!

Greater Albion has just released three new families on Myfonts.com.

Jonquin was inspired by some hand lettering seen on a World -War One recruiting poster. It’s a family of three faces for display work and headings designed to be used readily as an 'All-Capitals' face as well as in upper and lower case format. Regular and bold weights are offered, as well as an even more decorative incised form. The whole family is ideally suited for poster and advertising work, as well as book and record covers and period themed signage.

Maybe I'm just using the wrong keywords, but I'm finding this surprisingly hard to find on Google. I'm hoping the Typophile think-tank can help point me in the right direction. :-)

We're rebranding a company that was founded in the early 19th century (yes, they're *that* old) in the United States, and we're trying to find authentic typefaces from the era, or modern reinterpretations that offer a comparable effect.

I don't know what the early 19th-century designers used, whether they were American typefaces or imported, but whatever was relatively common at the time for promotional materials, we're hoping to emulate as closely as reasonably possible.

I know I have come across each of these faces many times but I can't put my finger on what they are or where I saw them. Any help? It would be much appreciated.

Cheers.

Syndicate content Syndicate content