standards

Hello everybody!

Just a quick question: Is there such a things as a guide to typical or standard character sizes? I'm in the process of creating a new typeface and I'm having trouble deciding on the width of some characters in relation to each other... for example, what's the typical length of the minus hyphen compared to the m dash? And the plus character? And so on and so on... Some very good info is in the "Character design standards" Microsoft Typography site, but no info on widths/proportions.

Also, any resource listing all the characters that "need" to be included in a font? My typeface will be Latin and Cyrillic and I'm using other fonts to look at which characters to include.

Thanks!

I am wondering if italic isn’t more a style than small capitals: what italic really is if you need to define it precisely?
In CSS, italic is called a "font-style" such as in the dedicated page on this website. Can we imagine that italic is the same type than a rounded or outline version of a font? If italic is just another font, it stays related to a typeface, such as weights isn't it?
Another result of my research tells that "angle", "weight" and "width" are separated characteristics.
If I need to make a typeface database, should I order fonts like:

Case 1

clauses's picture

fontstandards.org

I have set up a wiki dedicated to the technicalities of font production and their related topics. I invite you to join, add and edit content. Please use your real name and include a short description of who you are when signing up. You have to be signed up to edit the content, but the content is readable by everyone. The project is fully non-commercial, but you are of course free to use the information in the wiki to produce commercial fonts. Don't worry about entering complete data, editing is what the wiki system is good at.

Feel free to spread the word about http://fontstandards.org/.

Hope to see you there!
Claus Eggers Sørensen

In the latest development of web served typography, the World Wide Web Consortium today accepted and published the Web Open Font Format specification. This is an important step in the standardisation of this format, as set out in the charter of the recently establish W3C web font working group.

The most notable and exciting thing about this is that WOFF was jointly submitted to the W3C by the Mozilla Foundation (whose Jonathan Kew developed the format along with Erik van Blokland and Tal Lemming), Opera Software ASA, and Microsoft Corporation. And it isn't often that I use bold italics.

Links:
1. The submission documentation.

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