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A new report from the Brand Perfect™ initiative by Monotype reveals the need for brands and technology providers to collaborate with global publishers, enabling all parties to harness the growth opportunities that a “cross-platform” approach to advertising could bring.

Arabesque and Bon Air, two alphabets from two different centuries, are not what most people immediately think of when they think "wood type". These quirky script fonts simulate hand lettering from very different eras and are now brought into the digital age for the first time ever. A third font, Catchwords , brings a classic printshop resource into the digital designer's toolbox.

Detailed information regarding these releases, including the "Making Of The Font" feature, can be found at the Hamilton Wood Type Foundry website: here.

Can someone please tell me what font is used for Simple.
Thank you so much;)

 
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Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just launched the Doncaster family on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Doncaster is a bold display face which emphasises legibility and clarity, but which combines those qualities with a distinctive flair. The designs have a timeless quality, making them equally at home today or even in Victorian inspired design work. All of the faces are ideal for poster work, signage or for really eye-catching but not ostentatious headings and titles. Seven faces are offered combining upper and lower case forms with incised and embossed decoration as well as an italic form.

Here is a specimen sheet showing all seven faces:

Hi folks,

I am looking for any examples of Blackletter typography used in food packaging or food advertisements. If you could send links or reference any examples, that would be most helpful.

Thanks!

The Spargo family of six typefaces has just released on Myfonts.com and on Fontspring.

Spargo is inspired by 20s and 30s American typefaces, often seen on share certificates and other securities. We thought it was time to bring a touch of transatlantic boom and ebullience to our portfolio of typefaces, not to mention a healthy dose of Roaring 20s spirit. Spargo is the result, offered in six all capitals display typefaces.

Here are speciments of the six faces...

In the past year or so, I've seen this one geometric typeface pop up in (I think!) at least three applications, all in billboard ads or public transport ads. I always notice it by subconciously thinking "what's wrong with that Futura?" and then seeing that it's a different typeface entirely - square tittles, less elegant, tighter-spaced, very different /t/ and /e/.

Any clues?

Greater Albion has just launched Flapper, a family of four faces on Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

Flapper is family which embodies a great deal of fun and more than a little spirit of the roaring 20s. If ever a set of typefaces could dance a high kicking Charleston, these are they. Flapper is offered in regular, condensed, oblique and outline forms, and they all bring a great deal of fun and life wherever they are used. The Flapper family (yes, think of one of those dancing 20s girls with a long string of pearls...) is ideal for casual heading, bold captions, poster work and anywhere else a sense of fun is required.

We just released the second in our series "The Ten Commandments of George Lois." The quotation reads The creative act, the defeat of habit by originality, overcomes everything. When I first approached George about collaborating, this was his immediate suggestion and remains one of his more celebrated statements.

My favorite quote of his, "Great ideas can't be tested. Only mediocre ideas can be tested" was the first release in the series.

A portion of the proceeds from sales of this shirt will benefit the Herschel Levit scholarship fund at Pratt Institute, Mr. Lois' alma mater.

Here are samples of Greater Albion Typefounders' latest two releases, which have just launched on myfonts.com and fontspring.com.

Paragon is a display Roman family of nine faces, combining elements of formality and fun. It embodies a high degree of contrast between near hairline horizontal strokes and bold vertical strokes. The family is offered in three widths and in regular, small capitals and title faces. Use Paragon to lend impact to your next design project.

This case remains unsoved at the MyFonts.com WhatTheFont forum. I thought I'd give you Typophiles a crack at it.

It's an older (3-4 years now?) Starbucks advertising font. I haven't seen it anywhere else, so worst-case it's proprietary.

Any ideas?

Greater Albion has just released three new families on Myfonts.com.

Jonquin was inspired by some hand lettering seen on a World -War One recruiting poster. It’s a family of three faces for display work and headings designed to be used readily as an 'All-Capitals' face as well as in upper and lower case format. Regular and bold weights are offered, as well as an even more decorative incised form. The whole family is ideally suited for poster and advertising work, as well as book and record covers and period themed signage.

Hi everyone, brand new here!
I have been searching everywhere trying to figure out this font and I'm hoping I can get some new insight here. I'm hoping to find the exact font to the new Kodak ads they're running. Neutura is close, but some of the letters are different like the lowercase t.

Here is an image:

I appreciate any help you guys can offer!

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