workflow

Hi everyone,

I've been wanting to get into type design for a long time and now that I'm getting more serious about this, I find it kind of hard to actually start off because I don't know what the recommended workflow is. Are you supposed to create the shape in Fontlab or is it actually common to design the outlines in illustrator or inkscape, for example (these two seem to have a better range of tools for this task)? I've seen a lot of videos where people create the basic shapes in illustrator and export them to Fontlab later on.

Thanks for your help.

msmiths's picture

Typeface Family Workflow

I'm curious about type designers workflow in regards to complete type families that range from the extremes of Hairline/Thin to ExtraBold/Black, including italics.

The reason I ask is that I understand it comes down to individual preferences, but I'm wondering if there is a standard that carries over through everyones process.

I'm most comfortable starting with a 'Regular' weight and then moving towards either light or bold extremes and with FontLab Studios limitations using Multiple Masters it seems it would be best to develop either extreme first then generate instances in between.

I also understand that external tools such as Superpolator can help develop styles beyond the limitations of developing weights with FontLab Studio alone.

Hey everyone,
Been working hard on a few families as of late and before I was ready to generate and start testing I hit a "snag". It wasn't a snag really, just a question about hinting. Is it really important with the advances in screen technologies nowadays?

I've looked around online and even read a few manuals and all signs point to yes however most of these articles that give you tutorial advice on hinting haven't been updated since 1998. And I'm sure advances in screen resolution and type rendering have moved on since then.

So the question still remains... How important is hinting to typeface design and production now?

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