safari

Hello,

I've stumbled upon a bug in Safari (and webkit browsers) when using the Mark feature in web fonts,
As demonstrated by the screenshot, when a word has diacritics either on the beginning or the ending, the word space gets omitted.

I've tried my own fonts, and multiples fonts by other vendors but i get the same result, Only fonts that implement the Mark feature display the error.
Is anyone else facing the same problem?

Tested on Safari 6.0.5/osx 10.8.5

Hi there,

My first post on the Typophile forum. My issue: Some glyphs of my first ever font Agràve aren't showing properly in Chrome and Safari. In FireFox and Internet Explorer the … : and ; do show how they supposed to look. For example the triple dots are reduced to just 1 dot.

I use @font-face in the CSS code and the original OTF (from Glyph App on the Mac). So I assume there is nothing wrong with font file, and nothing went wrong in convertng becauce nothing was converted :-)

What can be causing this strange problem? Anyone?

Daan

clauses's picture

Safari font size discrete steps

¿Por que is Safari doing these discrete steps (top part of image) in font-size when Firefox is not (lower part of image)?
The way Safari does it is winding me up to the n'th degree.


Zebramatic - A Lettering Safari

Zebramatic is a font for editorial design use, to create headlines and titles in eye-catching stripes. Constructed to offer flexible and a variety of graphical possibilities, Zebramatic type is easy to use. The font is offered in three styles: POW, SLAM and WHAM. These styles work both as ready-made fonts and as patterns to create unique, individualized type. The font design’s full potential is unleashed by layering glyphs from two or all three styles in different colors or shades.


Zebramatic - A Lettering Safari

Zebramatic is a font for editorial design use, to create headlines and titles in eye-catching stripes. Constructed to offer flexible and a variety of graphical possibilities, Zebramatic type is easy to use. The font is offered in three styles: POW, SLAM and WHAM. These styles work both as ready-made fonts and as patterns to create unique, individualized type. The font design’s full potential is unleashed by layering glyphs from two or all three styles in different colors or shades.

I've been trying to figure out what this font is for a while. It's on a promotional piece my company has, but the piece was made before I started, and of course, there's no layered file and the old computer (that had the fonts on it) was replaced before I started here, too.

Any help would be appreciated!

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