letterpress

We're offering the last few prints of this one-off broadsheet, just in time for your Wood Type loving Valentine!
All proceeds support the Dubuque Book Arts Center at SlowPrint Letterpress!


Please see the Etsy listing

"Love is an endless mystery for it has nothing else to explain it."
quotation from "Fireflies" by Nobel Prize winning Indian Poet Rabindranath Tagore
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabindranath_Tagore)

Hello all,

I'm in need of links, photos, or anything you've got relating to Futura as seen in vintage printed materials (Bolded, Tracked out, and letter pressed, that sort of look)

thanks!

Hello everyone! Happy new year.
Can one of you help me ID this type sample? It is a scan from letterpressed stationery. Thanks for your help!

I'm thinking about making a set of wood letterpress blocks, and need assistance with some decisions.

Hi,
I plan to letterpress-print a Xmas card and have a difficulty deciding on the colour. I thought about using Pantone 877U or Black 7U.

The card will be printed on a 100% cotton stock and printer claims silver (PMS 877) doesn't look silver but greyish due to the paper high absorbability factor. However, I've found an example online that looks quite good...

I haven't seen any sample myself and don't have time to organise one so I have to trust someone... Anyone have an opinion on how silvery the uncoated silver is? Anyone used 877 or Black 7 on 100% cotton paper? Does it look different form normal grey/black? Would you recommend using it?

Thanks in advance!
Aleksander

graham bignell's picture

Reverting To Type

The exhibition is curated by Graham Bignell of New North Press and graphic designer Richard Ardagh and features prints and publications by progressive practitioners from around the world. Participants include renowned US broadsheet printers Yee Haw Industries and Hatch Show Print as well as British presses Hand & Eye, Typoretum, Mr Smith and Occasional Print Club.

Please join AIGA DC for a screening of the film Proceed and Be Bold!, the inspiring biography self-proclaimed "Humble Negro Printer" Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. At the age of 40, Amos left his job as a computer programmer to become an independent letterpress artist. We will be raffling off posters from Yee Haw Industries for AIGA members before the film.

For more about the film, visit the Proceed and be Bold site.

Registration for Proceed is now open. Admission for this event is $8 for students, $10 for members, and $12 for non-members. Limited seating will be available the day of the screening, and will be $10 for students, $12 for members, and $14 for non-members.


Saturday, October 16 at 2:00 pm
Session IV, Panel 3

“Engraving: Letterpress’s Shy Sister”

The American Printing History Association
35th Annual Conference
Corcoran College of Art + Design
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 Seventeenth St. NW
Washington, DC

http://printinghistory.org/programs/conference.php

(This presentation was first given at ATypeI in Dublin, September, 2010, http://www.atypi.org/03_Dublin/40_timetables/main/main12sept_html?date=2...)

Hello! Can anyone help me with recognizing this typeface?
It's a geometric sans serif, looks lot like a mixture of Erbar, Kabel, Nobel and Futura. I included the scan of the page as an attachment.
The book where I found it is printed in 1931 by Lumax printing press in Utrecht, Netherlands.
The most noticeable feature which makes a difference to other similar geometric sans serifs is the lowercase w which has a strange crossing. Lowercase a looks a lot like Erbar but it's a bit more condensed. Other letters are really round and geometric.

I have a guess that the typeface might be german but i'm not sure.

Any knowledge about the foundry or other sources to look at would be much appreciated.

Nick Sherman designed a new site for our metal type foundry using some web fonts by Font Bureau which reference faces designed by Morris Fuller Benton once cast on our ATF Barth casters. If you are interested in metal type or letterpress I hope you will have a look!

Thanks,
Daniel Morris
The Dale Guild Type Foundry
Howell, NJ & Brooklyn, NY

www.thedaleguild.com

We've released several new fonts since I last visited Typophile, so here's a quick update.

Aylward Font

2/0 letterpress business cards on Crane Lettra 600gsm (220#) Florescent White Cover

Design by Erik Brandt (http://geotypografika.com Minneapolis)
Printed at Slowprint Letterpress (http://slowprint.com)

Die-cut round-cornered cards 2"x2" for J2 Online.
2/1 letterpress, Crane Lettra 600gsm (220#) Florescent White
Custom mixed colors.

Design by Brad Emmons (http://bradleyemmons.com Philadelphia)
Printed at SlowPrint Letterpress (http://slowprint.com)

Hi everyone,

I am the Faculty Advisor of the Shakespeare Press Museum, a working printing museum on the campus of Cal Poly University in San Luis Obispo, California.

We have 18 operating presses and about 400 metal and wood type fonts.

Our never-ending problem is cataloging and indexing our collection of type, some of which is so rare that we don't know what it is, where it came from, or what to call it.

I have been working for several months to develop a method for cataloging the nicks on the type we have, which I plan to use to help identify type that is not distributed correctly, or at all.

Acknowledging the potential weaknesses of the system (different nicks in the same font, for example) I would like to put this out to the Typophile forum for comment.

Hi typophiles! I've been looking frantically for this font. A printer told me it is an old letterpress font used several decades ago. I'm very keen to get my hands on the digital equivalent.

It seems like a fixed-width sans. It reminds me of the typeface used for embossing serial numbers in metal plates.

Hope you guys can help me out.

Thanks!

I'm looking for the font that is from the "letterpress" in this banner. It looks like a variation of Courier but I can't find it. Thanks!

The original design was hand-set in foundry Optima and a funky Monotype Deepdene back in the late 1980s, and printed in a small run on the Universal I Vandercook.

I recently discovered the forms still standing in the galley. This new edition is printed on the 10x15 Heidelberg Windmill from photopolymer, made from new repro-proofs taken from the original type, and scanned at 2400 dpi. Minor artifacts from the proofing and scanning were cleaned up in Photoshop prior to making film and plates. However, the original design has not been altered, although it was awfully tempting to tweak the spacing once more before committing it to the press! ;-)

The photo was taken in a strong afternoon sunlight. Apologies for the excessive contrast. Need to find my copy-stand!

Designed by Sean Costik of Projekt.

Printed with metallic silver ink on Hahnemuhle German Etching Black 600gsm.
The Projekt logo was 'double-bumped', that is, I stripped the rest of the plate off the base and ran the cards through the press a second time. The Heidelberg's spot perfect registration allows for this kind of extra hit. Few other letterpress machines can match the Windmill!

I generally discourage trying to print on black, since most inks really can't cover and there's no brilliance to the resulting impression.

Hot off the press, cards for my consulting persona on Hahnemuhle's Copperplate+Bugra custom duplexed to make a 430gsm sheet.

This is the Bugra "Burgundy" color, and bright-white Copperplate etching paper.
The stock was dampened using a 16th century technique before printing from photopolymer plates on the 10x15 Heidelberg Windmill letterpress

The reverse side has been printed with two varnishes, tinted with bronze powder and silver... which only show up when the light is just right. The silvered varnish is used on the front, along with two 'normal' inks.

Impression depth is not quite as dramatic as it seems, but I had to use a hard side-light to be able to see the subtle varnish on the front of the card.

Fonts are Gill Sans with bold and italic. The Semiotx logo is from my own library, A*I Marlowe, a revival based on the Oxford Fell types, the forms here were altered by eye to make the lower-case weights match the caps (or was it visa versa?)

Letterpress

A printing method where type, in the form of metal or wood letters, or more widely since the end of the 1990s, photopolymer plates, and optionally graphics are placed on a press or another stable platform to accept weight and pressure, locked tight in place, with a quoin (specialized wedges), inked, typically with a rubber roller, covered with paper, or other impressionable and portable material, subjected to pressure and release within a press, after which the ink remains on the paper, and the process may be repeated.

There's a pretty good entry on letterpress at wikipedia.com

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