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Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released it's latest family on Myfonts and Fontspring. Wolverhampton is a new Neo-Victorian face from Greater Albion Typefounders. It's something of an example of starting with a small idea and running with it. This family of three typefaces (Regular, Small Capitals and Capitals) was inspired by a line of lettering seen on a late 19th Century enamel advertisement made by Chromo of Wolverhampton (hence the family name). The family grew, topsy-like, from a recreation of these initial fifteen capital letterforms to the three complete typefaces offered here.

Albia Nova is a bit of a new departure for Greater Albion-an unashamedly futuristic typeface. It was originally developed for a friend of ours-a set designed who needed some lettering on props for a science fiction play-the brief was to evolve conventional letter forms and speculate as to what they may look like in the future. As released Albia Nova is a more refined version of this idea, placing a bit more emphasis on readability (today) over evolution of the letterforms. The result is good for giving design projects a futuristic feel, but also has something of the 1970s and 1980s about it.

AlbiaNova has released on Myfonts at a 40% introductory discount.

Hi,

I'm trying to ID this glyph serif typeface used on the EF 'Live the Language: London' commercial. (See attachments)
Any lead would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks !

Thom

Greater Albion has just launched Flapper, a family of four faces on Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

Flapper is family which embodies a great deal of fun and more than a little spirit of the roaring 20s. If ever a set of typefaces could dance a high kicking Charleston, these are they. Flapper is offered in regular, condensed, oblique and outline forms, and they all bring a great deal of fun and life wherever they are used. The Flapper family (yes, think of one of those dancing 20s girls with a long string of pearls...) is ideal for casual heading, bold captions, poster work and anywhere else a sense of fun is required.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released tow new Typefaces on Fontspring and Myfonts:

Bertolessi, is a Roman face made fun, with a healthy dose of filigree curves thrown into the mix. It's an ideal compliment to our extensive Bertoni family, but can be used anywhere a bit of humour and flair is required.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Remember those 1970s science fiction dramas which had such charming 'futuristic' sets and backdrops? Remember the intriguing 'future' lettering and signage the set designers would devise-often coupled with interesting 'futuristic' spellings? Movella, Greater Albion's latest release, is something of a new departure for us and is a family of three typefaces inspired by that design ethos. The three faces- regular, italic and the 3d solid form - are all capitals faces which combine a feeling of 'retro-futuristic' design with easy legibility.

Movella can now be found on Myfonts and Fontspring. Here'a sample of it in action:

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