initials

Dear Typophiler,
please help me to identify this font. It's all initials.

Thanks. :D

Hello!

Last year I created the Magical Unicorn Typeface: A typeface, while flawed, still managed to capture the spirit of these noble animals in graphemes. However, it wasn't the end, a continuation of the Unicorn Typeface was a must.

http://www.arthus.nl/pegacorn/pegacornABC.gif

The Unicorn-Pegasus letters are an development of the Unicorn font. With the translation of the original drawings to the usable Unicorn font, many details disappeared and the hand-drawn character was lost. This series of initials is extremely detailed and compared to the Unicorn Font, no shapes have been cut. Each Unicorn-Pegasus is complete, from the tip of the horn to the far end of the tail.

A while ago I released a typeface based on Unicorns, which found it's way into some weird places I never expected (think about yearbooks for heavily Christian school communities) Of course you can still find the font, including the horn-less sans and rainbow numerals here.

Now I was thinking: What could improve this? I actually was thinking of a new series of Unicorns since the last one wasn't that well-drawn. But there had to be more! So I thought: What could be better than Unicorns with Pegasus wings?




For more information or to place an order, please visit alterlittera.com or myfonts.com (coming soon).

Thanks in advance for your interest.

Weingut Script Flourish is a decorative display font with high contrasts, perfectly drawn to the tiniest details. The font is trimmed to fairly large font sizes and is highly suitable for chapter titles or book jackets as well as Headlines, Invitations and wine labels, although also impressing with an astounding legibility in small typesettings. Inspired by the hand drawn Blätterschrift from the 19th century Mettenleiter’s Schriftenmagazin, its basic structure is related to the English Script. The creative process started in summer 2009 and after 600 hours of work, over a 2 year period, Weingut now unfolds to reveal all its charms.
Created by Georg Herold-Wildfellner.

Design with bicoloured capitals:

Doing a motion graphics piece using 18th & 19th century engravings of mythical animals, etc... Very fanciful and over the top. Need a font for some Initial caps that resembles an embellished engravers, similar to fonts used on currency, but more fanciful. Like this, only much nicer. This, I think, is rather blunt and vulgar.

I can only explain what I'm looking for as "Baroque Victorian" which I know is no help at all.

What are your favorite fonts (or EPS resources) for something like this?

Mynaruse Royale is an expansion of Mynaruse Titling. It features script capitals and widely tracked and smaller titling capitals. Mynaruse Royale has plenty of character and, with its powerful and sharp serifs that draw the eye. Mynaruse Royale is useful in settings that call for titling with an extra touch of elegance, such as a storefront, wedding program or formal invitation.
Mynaruse Royale contains a number of OpenType alternates, including alternate forms for the capitals that are large, drop cap like capitals instead of the calligraphic script capitals found in the default forms. Additionally there are non widely tracked lowercase forms that work well with the included alternate characters and ligatures.

My hip collegian daughter is always pushing me to make fonts which she thinks will fit the design trends of the day, which seems to come down to fonts which would look good in the monogram on the side of the Adams Family’s hearse, on an Ed Hardy t-shirt or tattooed on the back of a contestant on Tool Academy. Ok, that’s the extent of my second-hand contemporary cultural literacy.

My hip collegian daughter is always pushing me to make fonts which she thinks will fit the design trends of the day, which seems to come down to fonts which would look good in the monogram on the side of the Adams Family’s hearse, on an Ed Hardy t-shirt or tattooed on the back of a contestant on Tool Academy. Ok, that’s the extent of my second-hand contemporary cultural literacy.

What are opinions on how to set different letters in drop caps? I know it depends on the font, but setting aside unpredictable ornate initials, what are the accepted guidelines for, say, standard simple initials opening a book chapter or other long text document? I'm primarily interested in the guidelines for relatively formal straightforward documents (books, business reports, etc.); obviously people can do lots of whimsical things in informal or more ornate situations.

In particular, I'm wondering about two issues:

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