French

French punctuation spaces

Can any French typesetters (or of course English typesetters with extensive experience of French typesetting) give me the rules for which spaces should appear before and after the different punctuation marks?

I found this excerpt courtesy of Microsoft:

Note: When traditionally typesetting the French language a word space is inserted before or after several punctuation characters. These characters are colon, semi colon, question, exclamation, right guillemets, and left guillemets. Commonly the preferred word space used is a thin space of 1/8 the em. Some French typographers prefer to use a larger space character of 1/4 the em with the colon and some other punctuation characters. OpenType supports character substitution and language dependant variants.

A font which suggest French Cinema through the ages....

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Hi,
I was interested in what fonts people associated with
a) Cinema and film
b) French Cinema and film through History

I understand this is wide open to a lot of interpretation!
If it helps the cover will include a still from the French film " The Artist" (Black and white film, but made in 2011).
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1655442/

The client has asked for a bold modern cover (ha).
Though the actual film is a modern interpretation of a silent movie.

Cheers,

Jason

Can anyone convert this into a font?

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Hello all,

I found this image in an old french book of lettres. I was wondering if it could be desaturated and made into a font somehow. I do not have the resources or the know-how to do this. If you're able to do this and don't mind, I'd be very appreciative if you could send me over the .otf or .ttf file.

Thanks

Apollo from Fonderie Typographique Française

I stumbled over a http://link to some specimens of this typeface called Apollo. I like the quirks that sets it apart from similar faces, the C in particular, with the top terminal cut horizontally and the bottom terminal cut at an angle. Has this typeface ever been digitized or revived under another name? I hadn’t heard of it before.

Historical French Scripts into Typefaces

I'd like to know if the three historical French scripts have been translated
into digital typefaces?
As a reminder, here's the list of these XVI/XVII th century scripts:
Ronde, Bâtarde, Coulée.
Do the designers of the typefaces change their names for commercial purpose?

All I can find is ATFrenchScript which is a Ronde.
It originated from Stephenson Blake back in 1905.

Clement Numbers 1838

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Just released a nice set of numbers, rescued from a 1838 Type Specimen Book issued by the Fonderie Clement, Bruxelles.

The 5 is my favorite, the upper part is unique.
I fell in love with it. And so I decided to digitize them all.
I hope you enjoy them! I made them with love.

Available for download at http://goo.gl/cgxts Just $15

I'm not completely sure, but I think that Clement was a Didot's apprentice, who then started his own foundry. If anyone has more info on that, I will appreciate it.

Cheers,
Pablo

Looking for Auriol's Française-allongée or Française-légère - or suggestions

I'm looking for a more simple and clean looking Art Nouveau lettering, preferably relating to late 1800 (or so) France and would value any input you may offer. Auriol's namesake font looks a bit too mych like a stencil for my project. Something like DeVinne or Letterhead's Billhead might work?

Maison de Jour de Fête curly display font

Looking for the ID of this curly display font used for the lettering of Jacques Tati’s “Maison de Jour de Fête” movie.

http://www.maisondejourdefete.fr/

It’s definitely a digital font, not hand lettered, because of the identical glyph shapes and use for the lettering of the (digitally remastered) movie trailer.

No succes at MyFonts’ “What the Font”.

It looks like Vegacute, but isn’t.

LeFrancois : soon available !

LeFrançois is a typeface in OpenType format based on 3 series of capitals.
It seems to be classical but some glyphs show that it's not so conventional.
It's seems to be a typical French type, that's why its name is LeFrançois (with the accent please !)
With a particular work on kerning (about 5000 !) and ligatures, you'll be able to compose words as logotypes thanks to capitals and small caps.
It will be soon available at http://www.editions205.fr

italic serif from french paperback book Editions Gallimard, folio classique (copyrighted 1973 and 1995)

I'm trying to identify a font used in the body text of Les Misérables I by Victor Hugo, from a "folio classique", Edition d'Yves Gohin, ISBN 2-07-040922-8, copyrighted 1973 and 1995.

The most unique thing about this font is the italic "f", which has a slightly curved, almost straight edge on the bottom. This characteristic alone eliminates most famous serif fonts, I think. Also, the italic "b", ""d", "l" letters begin from the top with a curved, tapered hook. The italic "z" resembles the Times, as well as the italic "v".

Πin french school scripts

Hi everybody,

I have a general designquestion that is more related to native french speakers and writers. I'm doing a small research on school scripts and i want to know what is the tought or prefered Version of the /OE, especially the uppercase version in french school. I made some combination which you can see in the picture, but i don't know which one is the right one.

Thank You.

BAT - Bureau des Affaires Typographiques

Hullo,

I have not seen the info here yet, so I just wanted to let you know that a new French foundry launched last week (I am not related to the foundry - I just rather like the concept and the fonts): the Bureau des Affaires Typographiques. You can find all info in English here:

http://beta.batfoundry.com/client/document/bat_communique_20100427en_49.pdf

IMVHO I think Acier (a revival of Cassandre's type by Jean-Baptiste Levée) will be of interest to many of you since I have seen it (or a closely related character) used in a number of vintage London Underground font.

Type in Use: Deco / Font: Bree

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Bree was chosen as main typeface for body and titles in Deco, an ethical and ecologically aware French interior magazine.

In most cases, the body text actually uses Bree's alternate characters to ensure best legibility.

It was designed by Ljubomir Djordjevic from the French design studio Commeunarbre.

http://www.type-together.com/index.php?action=portal/viewContent&cntId_c...