chromatic

Hi,

we would like to introduce you Show, a multi-layered chromatic font family based on an old Victorian style wood type. http://show.juanjez.com/

Show designers Inés Atienza and Juanjo López are members of the Familia Plómez association, a small printshop based in Madrid that devote their efforts to promote everything about letterpress printing, calligraphy, and lettering. One of our favorite typefaces from our collection of wood types has been the basis for creating a new digital typeface.

http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/ourhousegraphics/tynne/

I adjusted the tracking and kerning, then I made out-line-drop-shade versions of the roman and the italic which work independently or as part of a layered tow-colour font.

For Immediate Release:
Buffalo, NY USA- November 2, 2012

The Hamilton Wood Type Foundry announces two new fonts- HWT Antique Tuscan No. 9 and HWT Borders One…and a newly redesigned HWT Foundry site.

HWT Antique Tuscan No. 9 is a very condensed 19th century Tuscan style wood type design with a full character set and ligatures. This design was first shown by Wm H Page Co in 1859 and is the first digital version of this font to include a lowercase and extended European character set.

I'm interested in layered fonts like History (Typotheque), I've looked on Myfonts with the chromatic tag and they all look very similar, even the H&FJ one isn't that interesting...

edit: Just found Funcity

I am in the early stages of developing a chromatic face that, by design, employs a lot of slight diagonals (1 to 5 degrees off the horizontal or vertical). The glyphs are made to look as if they were formed by folding strips of paper (I know, I know it's been done before). In addition to the pair of companion chromatic fonts within the family (each representing a different side of the strip of paper), I want to make a monotone version that somehow achieves the 2-sided effect without the use of multiple colors.

The solution I've arrived at to simulate that 2-sided effect is to, in the areas representing the back of the strip of paper, block or mask out strokes that run parallel with the strip. The problem I've encountered in testing the viability of this solution is that the edges of the strokes (set at the aforementioned slight diagonal angles), as well as the edges of some of the solid sections, appear quite "jaggy" when I test the PS OpenType font in Illustrator or InDesign.

Kristians Sics's picture

Aramara Chromatic released

Aramara Chromatic is a display typeface to write in colour. It contains characters for all the European languages and is released through YouWorkForThem and MyFonts.com.

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