ligature

Hello,
Recently I've seen some examples of יהוה in Biblical text with אדני written under the final ה. Does anyone know of a font set with this as a set character perhaps similar to the Arabic الله?

jidoe's picture

Non-joining ligature?

I'm wondering if technically speaking a ligature must be two letters that are joined together, or, can you have a ligature in which there are 2 letters designed to work together but don't actually join?

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

Hi, I'm having trouble trying to create a ligature using Unicode character codes, up to this point I haven't tried to use a Unicode value so I have no Idea if I am going about it the right way.

The ligature in question is an asterisk and another asterisk being replaced by a black star (** = ★)

I've tried the full word, the utf-8 value for it and Unicode U+ but nothing seems to work. I've had a look around and cant seem to find what is wrong.

The problems seem to lie with the '+', (Error came up with = 'invalid token (text was "+")'). But that's the only clue I have.

Theunis de Jong's picture

Unicode vs. "liga" feature

Technically it is possible to add both a ligature in the common form of "f_f_i" (and its accompanying Feature code) and a separate Unicode glyph for the same character -- U+FB03 for "ffi" -- to the same font.
Is this a good idea? I'm pretty sure it's not!

I only tested this with InDesign, but I vaguely recalled that it would automatically use "fi" and "fl" ligatures, if a font had these characters in the correct Unicode positions. However, a quick test with a freshly created OTF font shows it does not (in CS4, at least). Perhaps this is (or was) only true for Plain Old Type 1 fonts without any further OTF enhancements.

Hi there!

I am fairly new to vectorizing type and I would like some very constructive and critical feedback. I am very new to Glyphs and that is what I used to build this out (see the below to get all intimate with my nodes). Please let me know what you think! Where I can improve it, and other thoughts.

Jason Alejandro's picture

AD Ligature

Greetings,

A colleague of mine is working on a book of Thoreau's letters and a question was raised as to whether we could use an AD ligature (as in A.D. or Anno Domini) in the text. I had never seen one and was curious to find out more about it.

A quick search revealed this Flickr photo of the ligature on a bell in Boston. The quality of the photograph is terrible and that's all I was able to find.

I'm hoping someone here is more familiar with this ligature and can point me to some other examples of it.

& (the ampersand) is a ligature for 'et', latin for 'and'. Although archaic you can use '&c' the same as 'etc' as a shortened 'Et cetera'. & (the ampersand) being a ligature for 'et', I am curious to whether there are any historical examples of ligatures being designed for 'etc'.

I created an example of what a ligature for 'etc' could look like: http://bit.ly/cKOH8v

Does anyone know of any actual historical examples?

I realised a few days ago I know nothing about ligatures involving ellipses - things such as "What did she ..?" or "I said, get your filthy ..!". I couldn't find any useful information from the general internets, and it's certainly not a kind of ligature ever considered for inclusion into the unicode standard. I also couldn't find a thread in the forums here concerning this type of ligature, so my question really is: who has thought about these?

Has anyone ever seen a discussion of this ligature in a book or on the internet? I'd love to know what history it has.

- Mike "Pomax" Kamermans
nihongoresources.com

tnorris's picture

"rv" & "ry" ligatures

I'm putting together some secondary logo fields for a healthcare system's new identity and having major problems with the "rv" and "ry" pairings. I've searched the interwebs and haven't found any standard ligatures for these. I've had to keep the kerning pretty tight because some of the names get pretty long (ie: Physical Rehabilitation), but I don't think it's too tight.

The font is DIN Next Regular, and I've gone ahead and created my own ligatures. I'm not a type designer so I thought I'd post what I've got and see if anyone has ever had this problem themselves and to get any general feedback on my solution.

Fire away! And thanks for any help.


I run on Windows XP Pro. Over the last few years I've been "collecting" some good quality OpenType fonts, many from P22 Type Foundry in their "PRO" format. The "PRO" .otf files include a lot of the special characters: ligatures, glyphs, swash caps. small caps, etc., etc.

Problem: The Windows Character Map accessory program will only show me the standard 256 characters usually included in .ttf fonts.

I use a page layout program (Serif PagePlus X3) that is able to display and implement a font's special characters. But, having to open large, fullblown software just to view a character's map is ponderous.

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