Cyrillic

Good morning good people,
My department of designers are aggressively reassessing the brand image of the company we work for, starting with consistency of visual language. The Senior Designer established that the current corporate typeface, Helvetica Neue (or is it properly Neue Helvetica?), is perfectly suitable for our needs. It works quite well with all the various weights and styles for the US market, however our international offices are just frustrated. Characters are missing for the Bosians and the Russians do not have enough variation with the basic cyrillic family they have and so on and so on. Many of the offices have elected to use Myriad Pro as a substitute and it's just destroying our brand objectives. This must stop.
I found this:

Hi to all!
I'm just posting my draft for the font project called MONOARCH.
Will appreciate your opinion.

Cheers!

Hi everybody,

Im working on a font that includes latin1, hebrew and cyrillic.
I already designed all the glyphs. Now I need to know what should I do before generating the font.
I know is a big question, Im sorry, Im really lost in this step.

Thanks!

CONFERENCE:

Based on the success of the Granshan non-Latin typeface design competition held each year since 2008, the Granshan 2013 non-Latin conference will travel to Southeast Asia for its second incarnation:
http://www.granshan.com/

Organized by Typographische Gesellschaft München (tgm) and its partners*, the core of the event is comprised of four days at the end of July featuring workshops, presentations, exhibitions and a symposium. With presenters and attendees from all corners of the world, Granshan is the only conference focused on non-Latin typefaces. As such, it has itself become a focal point of this rapidly growing and maturing field.

* http://www.granshan.com/en/good-ideas-strong-partners

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COMPETITION:

A tex input file to use with XeLaTeX and the corresponding pdf output in order to compare Brill with Times New Roman on a text of width 90mm. Files meant for the thread http://www.typophile.com/node/103271

The input text is utf8 encoded and should normally have extension .tex.

Hi Typophiles,

I'm a publisher and designer and need to establish good type design parameters for Russian books. I don't speak Russian and therefore can't come up with settings that Russian readers would consider ideal for sustained reading. For English text and the usual text faces, the ideal number of characters (including spaces and punctuation) is about 67 per line. Has anyone heard of an ideal number for Russian? Grateful for any lead. :)

I've added cyrillic characters to one of my opentype truetype fonts. This is my first time designing anything beyond Latin 1. How do I generate it in fontlab so that the cyrillic characters are included? These are the questions that I have:

in Font Info>
Encoding and Unicode> I already have 1252 Latin 1 and Macintosh Character Set added here, I'm guessing add 1251 Cyrillic?
What about the Microsoft Character Set drop down menu? Do I leave that Western (Latin 1)?
What about the Mac script and FOND ID drop down menu? Do I leave that as Roman?

in Font Info>
Encoding and Unicode> Custom [cmap] encodings> Do I add anything here?

in Font Info>
Encoding and Unicode> Unicode Ranges> I'm guessing I check Basic Latin, Latin-1 Supplement and then Cyrillic?

The organisers committee of the New Cyrillic 2012 type competition has announced extended submission date. They are glad to receive participants works up to 31 December 2012 23:59 Moscow Time.

New Cyrillic 2012 is a Cyrillic type competition for young type designers (under 35 years old). The total prize fund for 3 places 600 000 Russian roubles (€15 000). More information, submission details could be found at http://newcyrillic.ru

new cyrillic 2012

dear typophiles!

i am glad to show you my new release, ZionTrain Pro typefamily. I started this font five years ago for city transportation and overall city corporative font as a part of project of second largest Ukrainian city Kharkiv identity by 3z studio. when designing distinctive characters for the font i was wonder how shapes from Ukrainian calligraphy works fine for wayfinding grotesque (look at the tails of Cyrillic -щ- and -ц- for example). unfortunately, this type was not used as planned, but was lived on the street as font of some cultural events, and was used for Kharkiv promotion.

it was featured in Slanted magazine #18 Signage/Orientation.

dear friends typophiles!
i am glad to present you new Arsenal contrast sans typeface. the project wins the contest for ukrainian font by Mystetsky Arsenal foundation and Stairfors design studio (some info in english about it you can find here and here).
so now it is typefamily of four fonts, released under OFL for free download.



interesting that it includes few unusual historic alternates for cyrillic letters (like latin-looking f with double bar for ф or round form for я) from old ukrainian origins.

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone recognized this type which appeared in a Russian book (Tango with Cows) in 1914. I think it is probably wood due to its size, but also I think that probably is based on a German design for roman (all the other types in the book have roman equivalents which were manufactured [if not originally designed by] german foundries.).

Thanks!

We are proud to announce the long anticipated release of the Cyrillic extension for our award-winning typeface Adelle. As its Latin sister, Adelle Cyrillic is intended for multi-purpose editorial use, providing robustness and personality. To guarantee consistency throughout the two scripts they share proportions, colour and general features without stepping beyond typographic acceptance. Please contact us if you own Adelle and would like to upgrade to the Cyrillic version.

More information: http://www.type-together.com/Adelle.

We are proud to announce the long anticipated release of the Cyrillic extension for our award-winning typeface Adelle. As its Latin sister, Adelle Cyrillic is intended for multi-purpose editorial use, providing robustness and personality. To guarantee consistency throughout the two scripts they share proportions, colour and general features without stepping beyond typographic acceptance. Please contact us if you own Adelle and would like to upgrade to the Cyrillic version.

More information: http://www.type-together.com/Adelle.

Due to popular demand and our continuous effort to broaden language support, we have been working on a Cyrillic extension for our award-winning typeface Adelle. As its Latin sister, Adelle Cyrillic is intended for multi-purpose editorial use, providing robustness and personality. To guarantee consistency throughout the two scripts they also share proportions, colour and general features without stepping beyond typographic acceptance. Alexandra Korolkova was a great help in finding the right tone and fine-tune subtleties of shapes. All 14 styles will be available later in the summer.

Contact us for more information: http://www.type-together.com/info

I would like to know where certain Roman and Cyrillic glyph variants come from.

In American cursive handwriting (Roman letters, naturally):
• the "f" looks more like a print "b" than a print "f";
• the "s" does not resemble any print letter at all;
• and the "r" looks like some kind of weird mutant print "n".

In Russian cursive (Cyrillic letters):
• the "г" looks like a backward print Roman "s";
• the "д" looks for all the world like a cursive Roman "g";
• and the "т" looks like nothing so much as a cursive roman "m"!

(The cursive forms for "г" and "т" are also used in italic.)

As for "r" and "г", I wonder if the same principle is at work for both.

I have seen some of the Russian "cursive" letterforms in print, in the credits for some episodes of "Nu, pogodi!"

Current progress:

Original post:

Here's a little project I've started recently. At present it's just uppercase: all the standard Latin (except S) plus a few Greek and Cyrillic caps I was able to start easily from Latin. There are a few alternates in there too. Any general observations are welcomed, and I'm particularly interested in the Cyrillic И. The current glyph (which is simply the alternate N reversed) doesn't feel right to me, but I can't really tell why.

Spacing is, as you can see, nowhere near complete. And no kerning is shown here.

The Eaglefeather font family is based on the alphabet designed by the master architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, for the Eaglerock project in 1922. In 1998, in conjunction with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesen West, P22 released the FLLW Eaglefeather Set, an adaptation of the font that included a set of extras and other type-savvy features. In 1999, the font was further expanded with a light version as well as small caps and a unique informal version in three weights- Regular, Light and Bold. P22 FLLW Eaglefeather Pro completes the family with the addition of two new weights, Hairline and Black, and adds new language support for Greek, Cyrillic and full Pan-European Latin plus OpenType features available for all pro styles. In all, the NEW Eaglefeather Pro Family contains 15 full-featured, OpenType fonts plus 20 basic styles.

Hi,

I am looking for suggestions for expert, active type designers that have experience with Cyrillic. i.e., who are the best ones that currently accept commissions (based anywhere)? Preferably with experience creating typefaces for editorial contexts (magazine, newspaper).

I know Gerard Unger has some of his typefaces in Cyrillic and that Monotype does commissioned work. Any other names and thoughts would be appreciated.

Thank in advance for suggestions...

MB

caffeinemood's picture

Correcting a glyph's hinting

I have recently purchased Quadraat Sans for use on a website and noticed it has some buggy hinting in Cyrillic glyphs at 17 px size. And I am just not going to use a different size.
That is, horizontal stems of letters "э", "з", "є", "н" are pixel lower than they should be — a really crucial detail in a Cyrillic font. And it ruins this font.

So I want to correct TrueType hinting of those letters. I know it's kinda illegal to do that, but that's not stealing a font or making a copycat and selling it. Just want to fix the bugs.

I have never dealt with hinting. So I had googled a lot, found some tutorials, but most of them are soo difficult to understand. TrueType hinting seems to be a mysterious process even for some of the authors of those tutorials.

Any recommendations for a slab serif with a cyrillic character set? It would have to have an @font-face license. Looking for something in the neighborhood of Archer, Caecilia, Centro, Copse, Ernestine, Museo, Serifa. Centro may work, but looking for some other options. Thanks!

Hi,
I need to create an English/Russian publication for a company using Trade Gothic font family as their corporate typeface. I've found equivalents for the Regular, Regular Italic and Bold styles on ParaType website (namely News Gothic) but am having difficulties finding replacements for the Extended and Bold Extended styles. Do you know any other Cyrillic typeface that could be used as a replacement to Trade Gothic, with regular and extended widths? Many thanks.

I’ve been working on a family of multiscript monospaced bitmap screen fonts, and I’d appreciate your comments.

Some remarks in advance:

Type Directors Club has posted an announcement of TDC Non-Latin Weekends, a series of professional seminars and workshops on non-Latin type design.

On 24 May, Russia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and other countries that follow Eastern Ortodox tradition, celebrate Saints Cyril and Methodius day. This day also commemorates the invention of the Glagolitic and Cyrillicalphabets.

In the ninth century, Glagolitic was invented by two brothers known as the “Apostles of the Slavs” to translate Christian texts into the language of the Great Moravia region. Later on, in the 9–10th century, one of their disciples who moved to Bulgaria invented the Cyrillic alphabet as a derivative of the Glagolitic and Greek alphabets.

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