condensed

Andre Simard is proud to announce the release of Corbeau Pro family

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June 30, 2012
I'm proud to announce the released of Corbeau Pro, my third typeface family. This typeface was created with the invaluable advice of Fred Smeijers and the support of Corina Cotorobai and Rudy Geeraerts from Ourtype Foundry.

Sans-serif, narrow, geometric, extra condensed typeface used for the masthead of a 1945 American West Coast magazine. Scanned.

A sans-serif, condensed, narrow, geometrical typeface that seems to be based on a narrow vertical rectangle used as a grid with a 7:2 ratio, perhaps.
It was used for the masthead of an architectural magazine, in 1946. Reminded me of Wim Crouwel's Hiroshima poster (1957) and I wonder if that particular typeface was in turn based on other typographic/visual trends at the time. Thank you!

19th-century condensed typeface used on 1958/9 Avalon Hill Gettysburg game counters

Trying to ID the very condensed serif face with slab ends (not slab serifs - I'm not sure 'slab' is the correct term). The sample in the image is ALL the letters and numbers used in this face on the counters for this game: C, I, 1, 2, 3, 4. The 2 looks very distinctive, though. I tried Identifont, but it doesn't suggest anything with those slab ends to the 3 and top of the 2 - only Bodoni and relatives with ball-ends.

Not much to go on, but any help is appreciated!

Thanks

WoodType

What is the attached font?

It's from the letterpress lab at the university of oregon. It is 15 pica sans serif. It is not labeled, and it bares no foundry stamp or company insignia. It is most likely older than 1965, and could be as old as 1900.

It only exists in caps, although there are a few varying figures. (two types of A's, etc.) I tried to pick the figures with a similar grain pattern, the thought being that they would be of the same shipment of type.

It is possible that this font has not been digitized, but any help you guys can offer would be amazing!

Wood Sans, Condensed, Gothic, Antique

Need some help Identifying this font:

http://pages.uoregon.edu/ppederso/woodsanssmaller.jpg

It's from the letterpress lab at the university of oregon. It is 15 pica sans serif. It is not labeled, and it bares no foundry stamp or company insignia. It is most likely older than 1965, and could be as old as 1900.

It only exists in caps, although there are a few varying figures. (two types of A's, etc.) I tried to pick the figures with a similar grain pattern, the thought being that they would be of the safe shipment of type.

It is possible that this font has not been digitized, but any help you guys can offer would be amazing!

condensed sans

Hi all - I'm getting frustrated trying to match this one accurately. I thought it would be easy for me to to ID it, but I think the "J" is throwing me off—perhaps it's custom. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks.

(my apologies for the small image…)