letter

Best font for a printed formal letter in Word 2013 (or LaTeX)

Hello! I am looking for the best font to write a printed formal letter to a respectable doctor (a professor) I have never ever written to. It must leave a good impression since he is very bussy and would surely dismiss a poorly written letter. I have the letter written in Word 2013 (Calibri). I can rewrite it in LaTeX (probably using LyX) if necessary. I prefer free fonts but I am willing to pay for a good font if necessary. Thanks for help.

Correct width and Em size

Hi,

I've been designing my first typeface for the last few weeks and I run into a question:

How do you know the proper width for each glyph?

I'm worrying that, for instance, the width of my "A" is too long compared to other letters. Is there a mathematical way or something like that, other than just the naked eye to figure out the correct proportions?

I'm mainly having this issue with the Caps.

Thanks in advance!

Certain letters not showing in Photoshop... unless copied (?)

Forums: 

I've been working with Lunatix Bold recently. It has all the accents and special characters I need.
However, when I'm writing something in Photoshop, it doesn't support certain characters, such as ¡, ¿, Ñ and the acute accented vowels (to be precise, it doesn't accept anything that is not the standard English set of characters). Then I write the text, using the same font, in Word. It's fine. I copy-paste the text into Photoshop... and it's fine!

Does anyone know why this happens? If this helps, I use FontCreator 5.6 to view the characters, and all non-standard characters are blue (the standard are green or sometimes red).

MeM — an interactive type system with a wide range of individual personalities

Forums: 

Sometimes a surprise, sometimes as expected – MeM is an interactive type system with a wide range of individual personalities.

The eccentric experimental type system created by Elena Schädel and Jakob Runge in 2012. It produces many personalities, each individual and emotive. You will never know which of the alternating letters is going to occur next. Basically, at the heart of it all is MeM: four different weights and letter shapes melded together into one powerful font and shuffled with the sleek usability of OpenType.