funny

Hi there, i saw this font today on a 1978 movie poster for the film "Piedone l'africano" (Flatfoot in Africa). I could not find out so far what font it uses. I do not assume that it is hand drawn, althought the two "O" do not look exactely identical. This could as well come from the poor printing techniqes. Can anyone help me identifying it? Thank you very much.

I thought this community might be interested in The Tale of Helvetica & Comic Sans by Bertie Wells. Is there a pending class war represented by those that use Helvetica in their work and those that use Comic Sans?

Here's the video on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsZGXf9ecoM
Here's the song on Bandcamp: http://bertiewells.bandcamp.com/track/the-tale-of-helvetica-comic-sans

i don't remember which font is this one. can anyone help me?

Apologies if this has been posted already, I have been away...

http://www.newstatesman.com/staggers/2013/04/new-statesman-go-back-futur...

Hello all,

We are currently gathering research for a compendium of graphic design miscellany. We would greatly appreciate any anecdotes you may know of. The publication will be targeted at designers of all ages as an kind of amusing factual compilation of tales and facts.

Examples include:- John Baskerville insisting on being buried standing upright. In 1820, his body was dug up and used as a sort of local peepshow. The curious could view it for the sum of 6 pence.

We would be extremely grateful for any contributions, the more entertaining the better!

mch's picture

Binary Craft

Smiley face

Here's another design I'm currently working on. Brand new Binary Design Soldiers font. I'm having fun with this one even though from a professional typographer's view they might look lame. Not sure yet how well it transcribed into b&w only (every letter is a little pixel fellow). A bit kitschy but I guess I find them charming that way.

Smiley face

Looking for help to I.D.
Thanks

I got this plaintive e-mail from a confused font customer, and am trying to craft a diplomatically informative reply. Any ideas?

"I would very much like to use the font on a banner for my jewelry booth at a local market, but the largest size that My Fonts offers is 72 pt. Would it be possible to purchase larger sizes for my own limited use? And if not, what would be the best way to enlarge what I already have? "

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released two new typefaces on Myfonts.

Eccles is another of our 'Early Victorian' typefaces, a series we started with the Wolverhampton family a little while ago. It might be described as 'extreme-Tuscan' in style but has a delicacy that many other Tuscan faces seem to lack. It's ideal for giving design projects a clear period feel, particularly in design and advertising work. We also see it haveing considerable application in preparing invitations to a certain type of happy event. At the other extreme, some of our younger associates have described it as 'your latest Steampunk font'. So perhaps we'll just have to settle on it having a split personality...

As seen in a paper on heart attacks:

Always look for the sunny side of life!

Greater Albion have jusst released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts:

Corsham:
Corsham was inspired by traditional stonemason's engraved lettering designs. Designed to be used alone, or in combination with our Corton family, ithas wonderfully lively air, with distinctive lively serifs and beautifully swashed downstrokes. Four faces are offered-regular bold and black weights as well as a condensed form. All faces include a range of Opentype features, including ligatures and old-style numerals. The Corsham faces merge 'olde-worlde' charm with fun character, yet remaining clear and legible for text use.

Metropole:

Leibix, inspired by a jolly trademark of the past, is a fun family of five typefaces which transcends different eras of the past. It has elements of the 1920s in its design, but is equally at home with projects having a 1970s theme of an up to the minute modern one. Leibix is intended for eye catching cartoon captions, in posters of anywhere else a casual impact is required.

Greater Albion is offering Leibix at an introductory 40% discount on Myfonts.

The Spargo family of six typefaces has just released on Myfonts.com and on Fontspring.

Spargo is inspired by 20s and 30s American typefaces, often seen on share certificates and other securities. We thought it was time to bring a touch of transatlantic boom and ebullience to our portfolio of typefaces, not to mention a healthy dose of Roaring 20s spirit. Spargo is the result, offered in six all capitals display typefaces.

Here are speciments of the six faces...

Greater Albion has just launched Flapper, a family of four faces on Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

Flapper is family which embodies a great deal of fun and more than a little spirit of the roaring 20s. If ever a set of typefaces could dance a high kicking Charleston, these are they. Flapper is offered in regular, condensed, oblique and outline forms, and they all bring a great deal of fun and life wherever they are used. The Flapper family (yes, think of one of those dancing 20s girls with a long string of pearls...) is ideal for casual heading, bold captions, poster work and anywhere else a sense of fun is required.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released tow new Typefaces on Fontspring and Myfonts:

Bertolessi, is a Roman face made fun, with a healthy dose of filigree curves thrown into the mix. It's an ideal compliment to our extensive Bertoni family, but can be used anywhere a bit of humour and flair is required.

I just want to know so I can find it and buy it.

Thank you.

Greater Albion Typefounders has just released the Spillsbury family on Myfonts.com.

Spillsbury was inspired by some examples of 1920s signwriting (principally seen on the side of some vintage vans-good thing they were in a photograph and not on the move!).

Spillsbury draws inspiration from these sources to provide a unique combination of legibility and flair, which echoes the charm of advertising and publicity material from the halcyon days of the 1920s.

A basic range of four display faces os offered - Regular, Plain (not all that plain really!), Shaded and Shadowed.

hi there i have been looking for the font(s) they've used on this cover for a couple of months now wih no succes

is there anyone here that has an idea which one it is? or a very very similar one and where i can find it?

thanks

to be more specific it is about the title: Rockabilly and the main article title: Lux interior

thank you in advance i really hope one of you can help me :)

kind regards

Annelies

Greater Albion have just released two new families on Myfonts and Fontspring.

Portello is a display family in the tradition of Tuscan advertising and display faces. It's a family of three 'all capital' faces. A perpendicular regular form is offered, along with an italic form (a true italic - with purpose designed glyphs-NOT merely an oblique) and a basic form for small text - which dispenses with the family’s characteristic outlined look. It offers the spirit of the Victorian era with ready and distinctive legibility. It's ideal for poster work, especially at large sizes, and for signage with a period flair.

Greater Albion Typefounders have just released the Worthing family on Myfonts.com and Fontspring (fonts.com release to follow).

Worthing aims to combine Victorian charm with modern-day requirements for legibility and clarity, and we hope, demonstrates that traditional elegance still has its place in the modern world. Meanwhile, for those who our curious about the naming of our fonts, Mr Lloyd our designer was reading Mr Wells (H. G.) “War of the Worlds” recently. No doubt some of you will remember the part that Worthing in Sussex played in that story. Worthing is offered in three styles, regular, alternate and shaded. It's ideal for Victorian and Edwardian era inspired design work, posters and signage, as well as for book covers, chapter headings and so forth.

Greater Albion have just released two new families through Fontspring and Myfonts.com.

The first of these, Cirflex was inspired by a 1930s shop sign, and makes an ideal typeface for Streamline Era and Art Deco design. Cirflex is offered in regular and bold weights.

I will provided the "Question of the Week" and give my answer. I hope in return, you share your answers.

Q: Who would win a fight, Batman or Ironman?

A: My money would be on Ironman. The guy can fly or jet around. Batman? He needs his vehicle and he can only glide, technically can't fly.

What do you think?

Remember those 1970s science fiction dramas which had such charming 'futuristic' sets and backdrops? Remember the intriguing 'future' lettering and signage the set designers would devise-often coupled with interesting 'futuristic' spellings? Movella, Greater Albion's latest release, is something of a new departure for us and is a family of three typefaces inspired by that design ethos. The three faces- regular, italic and the 3d solid form - are all capitals faces which combine a feeling of 'retro-futuristic' design with easy legibility.

Movella can now be found on Myfonts and Fontspring. Here'a sample of it in action:

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