Arno

I am trying to find a way of achieving the same colour, evenness and strength that Jenson conveyed, for instance, here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Jenson_1475_venice_laertius.png

I appreciate that there have been many digital typefaces inspired or informed by Jenson and I’ve tried some of them – Adobe Jenson, Arno, Legacy Serif, Centaur – but somehow all of them create a very different feel on the page.

I have been trying to put my finger on just what it is the 15th-century Jenson has that the modern typefaces don’t and just what it is that I find so attractive about the 1475 sample.

Personally, I love Adobe Arno Pro (over Garamond or Caslon). I have mostly used for brochures and for a magazine. Quick search reveled 0 results. Just wanted some views on its use - especially if anyone has used it for books.

Hi everyone

I am typesetting my first book and wanted to get some feedback on it. You can be totally brutal, I don't mind.

Please check it out here: Draft

Thanks in advance.
Besim

At least three versatile families that were included with CS3 are no longer bundled with CS4. That's disappointing. (I'm on a work machine that did not have CS3 installed.)

Does CS4 have substantially fewer fonts bundled than CS3?

I was given the responsibility of designing the programme for my church choir's Christmas concert at the last minute, and threw one together in a single evening. So it's very basic, and I was very limited in my type choices, but I thought typophiles would appreciate a seasonally-appropriate example of multiscript typography (it's a Korean church in France). Sorry about the picture quality.


The Korean typefaces used were Munchebu Jemok Batangche (문체부 제목 바탕체; "Ministry of Culture titling serif") for the display and Nanum Myeongjo (나눔명조) for the text. The Latin uses Arno.

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