Unicode

Dear typophiles,

Does there exist any available application or tool for generating a pdf (or jpg or png or...) unicode code chart? For example, input a range (say, start=0600,stop=06FF) and a font name: Then the resultant pdf gives you a unicode code chart covering that range (as supported by the named font), with the code point as caption per each cell...

Anything like that available? Perhaps an online utility? Seems like a common enough task that a utility may be floating out there somewhere...

Thanks in advance!

I'm looking for an italic font with wide Latin and Cyrillic support that looks similar to this Greek font, GFS Solomos. Here's a sample, Romans 3:21-26 (the first word is in GFS Decker for small caps):

The closest thing I have right now is the italic version of Garamond, but it's not quite right--the strokes are too thin and the letters are too narrow. The sample below compares similar glyphs, GFS Solomos on left, italic Garamond on right:

Thanks so much in advance!
--PADetz

Over at the Open Siddur Project, we've received a handful of requests for Unicode Hebrew fonts with interesting ligatures that I've seen in print but never before in a digital (Unicode) font.

The first is a bowing lamed. The second is a letter hey wherein the divine name אדוני (adonai, lit. lord/master) is spelled.

Has anyone seen a Unicode font with such ligatures? I'd also be interested in learning about Hebrew fonts supporting other unusual ligatures (in the private use area, I imagine).

Thank you.

Hello,

I installed the LisuUnicode font https://github.com/phjamr/LisuUnicode/blob/master/LisuUnicode-Regular.ttf on Windows 7 and it won't display unless you specify that you want to use that font. For example, if you select the Lisu font in Microsoft Word, it will display the Lisu input, but if you want to do anything in an another WIndows program, like Internet Explorer, it will just display boxes (unless the website has it specified in its stylesheet, that the font should be used). Interestingly it will always display in Firefox, but not in other browsers or in QQ (a chat program Chinese people frequently use). Lisu is a Chinese minority and there are a number of fonts available, but none works under Windows 7 or lower.

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

Hello everyone,
I try to explain you the problem.

I created a typography that has both common (e.g. between "f" and "i") and custom (e.g. between "p" and "p") ligatures and used FontLab to export the font in ttf.
Now I want an HTML page to display the font and I write & #xFB01 for common ligature between "f" and "i".
But where should I operate to display custom ligature between "p" and "p"?

Thank you in advance for your attention!
Filippo

I've found these spacing characters in Unicode. What are they for?

005E - CIRCUMFLEX ACCENT
0060 - GRAVE ACCENT
00A8 - DIARESIS
00B4 - ACCUTE ACCENT

and others.

We work with packaging for many countries and has to deal with many languages, many we don't read and with alphabets we don't recognize. To control this we use software to control that the unicode values are the same in input (text in Word documents) and output (pdf generated from QuarkXpress) We are now struggling with differences in input & output for accented characters in Vietnamese text. So I wonder if the accented characters in Word can be the input (the characters you type) and not the result (the accented character)
Or is there an other explanation of the different unicode values for the same character? (the visual character is correct, this is verified by vietnamese)

We work with packaging for many countries and has to deal with many languages, many we don't read and with alphabets we don't recognize. To control this we use software to control that the unicode values are the same in input (text in Word documents) and output (pdf generated from QuarkXpress) We are now struggling with differences in input & output for accented characters in Vietnamese text. So I wonder if the accented characters in Word can be the input (the characters you type) and not the result (the accented character)
Or is there an other explanation of the different unicode values for the same character? (the visual character is correct, this is verified by vietnamese)

When the new font Nirmala was announced with Windows 8, one expected it to be better than Kartika, its unaesthetic predecessor with unacceptable shapes. But Nirmala Malayalam adds insult to the injury inflicted upon earlier.

Sample these:
1. One conjuct has a missing stem
2. Has a confusing stroke ending style
3. Invents a clumsy way to handle descender portions
4. Substandard design quality, no optical corrections or proper stroke modulation

Please see the jpg attachment for details

Did the type designer(s) consult some one who knew Malayalam? Or did they think whatever they design will be accepted by others? I had pointed out the design problems in Kartika years back, but from repeating the same mistakes and making it worse it seems the people concerned donot care.

Hi, I'm having trouble trying to create a ligature using Unicode character codes, up to this point I haven't tried to use a Unicode value so I have no Idea if I am going about it the right way.

The ligature in question is an asterisk and another asterisk being replaced by a black star (** = ★)

I've tried the full word, the utf-8 value for it and Unicode U+ but nothing seems to work. I've had a look around and cant seem to find what is wrong.

The problems seem to lie with the '+', (Error came up with = 'invalid token (text was "+")'). But that's the only clue I have.

Hi,

I've come into a problem whilst trying to compile a font which contains some Japanese characters.
I have a basic Latin character set (MacOS Roman encoding), but with some additional unicode characters such as uni6782, uni571F – these total around 20 different characters.

The font compiles fine from Fontlab, and the characters are accessible in (All on Mac OSX 10.8) TextEdit, Adobe InDesign CS3->CS6, as well as OpenOffice. However, when I try and type these characters (via a japanese keyboard layout) or paste them in, the font reverts to a default system font which contains the characters.

Is there a certain Japanese name I need to apply for Microsoft Office (Word 14.2.0) Mac?
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Terry

Theunis de Jong's picture

Unicode vs. "liga" feature

Technically it is possible to add both a ligature in the common form of "f_f_i" (and its accompanying Feature code) and a separate Unicode glyph for the same character -- U+FB03 for "ffi" -- to the same font.
Is this a good idea? I'm pretty sure it's not!

I only tested this with InDesign, but I vaguely recalled that it would automatically use "fi" and "fl" ligatures, if a font had these characters in the correct Unicode positions. However, a quick test with a freshly created OTF font shows it does not (in CS4, at least). Perhaps this is (or was) only true for Plain Old Type 1 fonts without any further OTF enhancements.

I put the pre-alpha (but very usable for low enough resolutions) version of monospaced scalable variant of Unifont font to http://ilyaz.org/software/fonts.

My client has a corporate font (Unit Pro). The company produces many multilingual documents in languages using Latin script as well as in Chinese. Is there a way to tell Windows something like: if Unit Pro is selected and some characters are missing, use "Custom Chinese Font" instead? In other words, is there a way how to define custom fallback font for Chinese glyphs under Windows? Any help appreciated.

We would like to learn how to incorporate a unicode character that exists in one (or more) font sets, but not in the font that we wish to use. Unicode 0268 is a small letter i with a stroke in, for example, New Tomes Roman, but we want to have it in Caslon. Any suggestions

Hi! I'm designing a layered typeface with three weights and some extra glyphs (ligatures, swashes and some weird alternates). I made open type feature for ligatures and kerns but I let some extra glyphs without feature. When I use those glyphs and I change the weight, the glyph doesn't change. For example, if I write "BARCELONA" with one of my extra B's, and I change the weight, it change all the word except the B.
I've been looking the generated file and it seems that those extra glyphs without feature doesn't have UICODE names, so when we change the weight, they doesn't change. I've tryied to use the option GLYPHS>GLYPHS NAME>GENERATE UNICODE but it doesn't work.
Anyone knows what can I do to generate the same UNICODE names on the three weights.

sim's picture

Unicode naming

Is there a way to keep unicode when I append a glyph? I drew a roman font and all unicode and naming work well. Now I want to draw the italic one. So, I start from an italic vbf file I've already drew as a basic file and I want to import the new glyph I've inserted in the roman one. When I import it I lost the unicode name. Is some typophile user has a solution to append a glyph without lost the unicode number? I hope the problem description is clear enough.
Thanks.

Subject : WANTED - unicode sans font with differentiated Il1| & O0

I've been trying to find a simple sans serif font for a specialist mathematical programming language that uses special symbols (available in unicode fonts). Some unicode fonts have inconsistent symbols sizes eg Tahoma and Verdana, DejaVu sans has advanced logic symbols (the round ones) that are consistent in size but larger than all the other symbols.

These fonts render some or all of vertical bar, capital I small L and digit 1 identically. This is unacceptable in a programming language where a single wrong character can cause a bug that is very difficult to trace (the program will look right). Capital O and zero also need to be obviously different.

Hello all,

I am quite new to the process of creating a font so please bear with the supreme beginner-like questions about to be asked. I have 2 core issues, one of which pertains to display resolution and rendering (and the specs needed to build the font to the appropriate scale):

Glyph definition in relation to unicode standards
Pixel perfect glyphs for certain pixel scales

Given the table below, one can see that the only noticeable difference in the glyphs, is the one between the character U+FBE5 and the characters U+FBE4 and U+0620. For the other characters the glyphs from the Arial font are identical. One other thing that called my attention was the fact that indeed the Arial font considers the character pairs (FBE4, 06D0), (FBE2, 06C9) and (FBD7, 06C7) equivalent, as they have the same GlyphID's.

DotlessHyphen's picture

Python script

Need help to write a simple Python script. Leave your e-mail and I will contact you off list.

I'm trying to get a handle on new characters that have emerged in recent years, which are important enough to show up in standard Latin fonts (western + CE accented). Also secondarily curious about anything relevant to Greek and Cyrillic.

The ones I know about are currency symbols, such as the new symbols for the Turkish lira (U+20BA, http://typophile.com/node/90604), and the Indian rupee (U+20B9). Older ones include the Ukrainian hryvna (U+20B4) and Ghanaian cedi. Are there others I should be concerned with?

Hello people of typophile!

First of all, english is not my native language, so i hope not to make too much mistakes in my communication! I've been a reader of the forum for years, and by now I thought that my first post would have been for the release of a typeface, but nope.. not yet...

WOBURN, Mass.--Dec 14, 2011 -- Monotype Imaging Holdings Inc. (Nasdaq: TYPE), a leading global provider of text imaging solutions, has introduced the Arial® Unicode® MS Bold typeface. Comprised of nearly 50,000 characters, the newest addition to the Arial suite marks a typographical first — the ability to use a true, bold version of Arial Unicode.

Arial Unicode MS Bold complements Arial Unicode MS, the regular weight of the same design, which is included in Microsoft® Office® products and is shipped in various applications.

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