Latin

I'm looking for an italic font with wide Latin and Cyrillic support that looks similar to this Greek font, GFS Solomos. Here's a sample, Romans 3:21-26 (the first word is in GFS Decker for small caps):

The closest thing I have right now is the italic version of Garamond, but it's not quite right--the strokes are too thin and the letters are too narrow. The sample below compares similar glyphs, GFS Solomos on left, italic Garamond on right:

Thanks so much in advance!
--PADetz

Finally the Ek Latin and Ek Devanagari are available on www.ektype.in

The e-commerce part of the website is will under development. /Users/Admin/Desktop/Ek Type Flyer.png

Appreciate your feedback.

I am working on an exhibition about Samurai for an American art museum and am looking for designers that I might consult in choosing an appropriate Japanese typeface.

Japanese will only be used for select wall graphics and headings, and not for lengths of text. We have a curator on staff that is available to write, edit, and proof any text, but I am very much out of my league when it comes to understanding the design connotations of Japanese fonts. I am not so terrified of pairing Garamond with the Japanese version of Hobo (an obvious clash), as I am with pairing the Latin and Japanese equivalents of Bodoni and Tisa in a single headline.

Eskorte is a hardworking Latin-Arabic type family with an uncomplicated, regular appearance that conveys a crisp, businesslike tone. Its compact range of styles has been designed for easy use by non-designers in offices of legal and academic institutions, and corporate environments. Eskorte supports Arabic, Farsi, Urdu, and over ninety languages using the Latin script.

The various styles were designed together, resulting in a smooth, coherent style across the family. The italics take on livelier, more fluid forms that echo the design of the Arabic, allowing them to sit perfectly together, while the extrabold adds punch to official announcements and notices.

The Arabic was designed in consultation with Titus Nemeth.

To create a connecting script, for Latin use,
I was searching to get the 'Cursive attachment' working on a script that is written from left to right.

Any chances I get this to work in Latin text?
or any other technique to connect glyphs together with anchors?
If someone can reference to an example, it would make understanding of 'feature curs' easier

On the OpenType Feature File Specification
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/opentype/afdko/topic_feature_file_syntax.html#6.c
it is not mentioned it is only possible with right to left scripts.
But on other sources, there is stated it doesn't work with left to right, like
http://glyphsapp.com/blog/arabic

Ps, is it required to work with .init and .fina if I want to work with 'curs'?
Most times it is done so…

I am crazy about this typeface, but cannot seem to locate it's origin. Was a part of a beer bottle package. Any insight would be much appreciated! Thank You!

tsb56's picture

identify font

I'm designing a blog for a theologian, which means he'll be occasionally writing in (biblical) Hebrew and Greek. If possible I'd like to steer off the beaten path and use a webfont. Do you know of any webfonts that offer this kind of language support?

[I initially thought of Gentium, which would be a great choice, but the webfont version only includes the Latin alphabet.]

Thanks in advance for your help.

EDIT: just noticed Gentium does indeed include WOFF files for Gentium Plus, but I'm trying my best to avoid self-hosting the files. Still, I guess there's my first typeface for the list. Any others?

tlathropid's picture

Yacht name font

Hey Typophile,

First post, thanks in advance. Looking for the font that this "Rose Tena" yacht name is made of. The image above came from a photograph, I cut it out of the photo and straightened it so it was vertical. The yacht is in the Midwest region of the USA. The lettering was applied with vinyl decals, and I would venture to say that it was done within the last 10 years. The unique part about this font is the "T". If we can identify that, I believe the rest of the font will follow. It feels like it has a spanish, or latin flair to me. Your help is greatly appreciated, as I have been tasked to use this particular font on another project.

Thank you,

TLathropID

I’ve been working on a family of multiscript monospaced bitmap screen fonts, and I’d appreciate your comments.

Some remarks in advance:

Hello!

Im doing a multilangual project that needs a font that supports the chinese, latin and cyrillic alphabet.
Is there some contemporary, interesting typefaces out there that you can reccomend?
thanks!

Hi there,

I'm looking for nice serif for a magazine.
It's a Magazine about Cars so the Serif should not be to sweet :)
It's published in several languages:
German
English
French
Italian
Spanish
Portuguese
+ Russian

(also in Japanese, Chinese and Korean, but this is another problem but don't hold back)

Can anyone recommend a good latin+cyrillic serif?
I liked Arnhem and Albertina but don't know if they work.

I would be very happy if anyone could help!!


The successful typefamily Skolar by David Březina, has been extended to a pan-European character set. This version supports around 90 languages that use the Latin, Cyrillic, or Greek scripts, featuring over 2400 glyphs. The Cyrillic was awarded a Special Diploma at the international type design competition Modern Cyrillic 2009 and won the first prize in the Cyrillic text type category at Granshan 2009. As a bonus, Skolar PE can correctly place any accent from the font above or below all Latin letters, a useful feature for many linguistic applications.

read more http://www.type-together.com/Skolar


Rosetta is an independent foundry, created by David Březina, José Scaglione and Veronika Burian, with a strong focus on multi-script typography. It is a response to the increasing interest and need, within the global market, for multi-script typefaces that are both technically and aesthetically of the highest standard. Rosetta is committed to promoting research and knowledge in that area and to support excellence in world script type design.

This post describes how I have created matching Hebrew and Latin for my own font "Mike Hebrew".

I did not add this post to the "Creating a Merger of a Latin and a Non-Latin Font Style" because many of the replies did not deal with designing fonts. Furthermore don't want to be involved in criticizing other people's fonts, other people or to argue about history etc.

This design problem will be different for each kind of Hebrew font. If the Hebrew font is Frank Ruel then the solutions will be quite different to solutions that would be appropriate if the Hebrew font is Levenim. The is NO SINGLE SOLUTION.

What I write here only applies to matching the Hebrew and the Latin letters in my own "Mike Hebrew" font.

Hello Everyone!

The Indian Type Foundry is proud to present Kohinoor, a new super type family supporting Latin, Devanagari and Tamil, three of the most commonly used writing scripts of India.

Kohinoor is an elegant low contrast typeface suitable for both body and display text. It comes in 5 upright styles, and where available also with corresponding Italics. As all ITF fonts, Kohinoor is a Unicode-compliant font and has full support for the conjuncts and ligatures.

Kohinoor's Bengali, Gujarati and Gurmukhi versions will be available in 2011.

Thank you!

------------------------------------

Updated description: this is a contemporary serif family I'm working on since January 2010. It was initially just for personal use, but the project grow up to embrace complete Latin, Cyrillic and Greek scripts, besides phonetic alphabets, arrows and dingbats.

It's a text font and the family is planned to have several weights in roman and italic versions. I believe it will be released in early 2013.

Goals:

1. it must be suitable for books and magazines, with more contrast than contemporary typefaces like Meta Serif, Greta Text or Stuart.

2. it must be clean and legible, with high x-height, generous counterspaces and reduced ornamental elements.

Hi,

I ran into a problem today. Currently working on my first font in FontLab, I wondered if there is a method to add for instance all ISO-Latin-3 glyphs (just the empty glyph cells) to a font without generating hundreds of glyphs one by one. I searched the manual but found nothing. Fontlab.com FAQ reffers to a page taken down in 2008 for this problem.

Sorry for asking such a basic question. I hope someone can help me with this. :)

Thank you in advance.

PS: I hope I put this into the right section of the forum. If not sorry for that.

Well I have at last got around to designing a Latin character set for Mike Hebrew.
I have put an example of Mike Hebrew Regular on the Critique forum.

http://typophile.com/node/65840

Please pull no punches!
Mike

The Mike Hebrew font family has a set of Latin characters. Getting the Hebrew and Latin to match is not at all straightforward indeed Latin and Hebrew are incompatible in both metrics and style.

At first I took Tuffy for the Latin with few modifications but now I'm attempting to design a new Latin alphabet.

Here is an example. My goal is that the Latin should be unobtrusive in its secondary role. Please help me get a good set of Latin characters.

PLEASE CRITICIZE THE LATIN ALPHABET.

Indices : Designers : David Březina

Czech type designer and typographer, writer, lecturer, the impresario of TypeTalks, and partner at Rosetta Type Foundry. He got Masters degrees in Informatics (Masaryk University, Brno) and Typeface Design (University of Reading, UK). From 2004 to 2007 he also ran his own design studio, with projects in graphic, web, and interface design. He has been working as an associate with Tiro Typeworks and giving various type workshops around Europe.

Agamemnon began as an experiment I did on Fontographer years ago. I revived it over a year ago and began discussing it here on Typophile. That original thread is here, but has become long and unwieldy, potentially frightening off new critics trying to wade through the history of revisions. I've since moved development of this font to FontForge. The ability to edit with Spiro curve technology has been invaluable!

The font could be categorized as transitional and slab serif. The serifs and horizontal strokes are cupped and curved, creating a visual texture that should maintain legibility at small sizes and great distances. The current weight, though, is a tad awkward; too heavy for a book weight, but not quite a bold.

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