language

Fonts language support

Hello everybody, I have a question and I can't find an answer in the internet.

I'm in a process of designing a typeface - TT Nord. It's not the final design by that link. Anyway, what bothers me is that I've drawn many glyphs, including Cyrillic extended and Latin extended a and b and others. Is there any way to know what languages does my font support? Maybe a script or some kind of a web service?

Thanks in advance?

Online language tool for supported languages

Forums: 

Hi guys,

glad to join this great place.

I have a question: do you know any online tool (or any clever method) to display languages list which are supported by the font? I'm making one and it contains German, Polish & Spanish glyphs, but I don't know which other languages are using the same glyphs as mentioned.

How can I check it ?

Cheers and thank you in advance.
Lucas

Opening a discussion on Digital V Print

To introduce myself briefly, I am a 22 year old Masters of Computer Graphic Design candidate in Whanganui, New Zealand. I am looking to start bit of a dialogue here: digital publication compared to print publication, with respect to the retention, enjoyment and legibility of the information we publish. I have included some questions to begin the discussion below. I would greatly appreciate your participation in this discussion, and hopefully it is something that we can all grow and learn from.

Visual appearance of the language

Certain font were designed to suit certain languages. For instance German needs smaller uppercase letters because of so many capitalized words. I imagine that Bodoni was designed for Italian. We also know international fonts.
Does anybody has a clue, hint or information about some serious literature about this problem.
I am interested in visual characteristics of all official European languages.
Thanks for any suggestion or help.

Visual appearance of the language

Certain font were designed to suit certain languages. For instance German needs smaller uppercase letters because of so many capitalized words. I imagine that Bodoni was designed for Italian. We also know international fonts.
Does anybody has a clue, hint or information about some serious literature about this problem.
I am interested in visual characteristics of all official European languages.
Thanks for any suggestion or help.

diacritical map

Forums: 

Hello all,
I've done a search and can't find exactly what I'm looking for.

I am trying to find a single source that has a list of diacritical marks, their unicode and corresponding languages.

Wikipedia seems to have a good source of quantity but its not necessarily user friendly to sort through.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacritic

Thanks!

Periodic Table of Hangul

Hi,

My name is Darim Kim and I am a graphic designer.

I am currently working on my personal project related to Hangul, which is the Korean writing system.

I designed the attached "Periodic Table of Hangul" for the sake of compiling the essential information about Hangul, especially for beginners. The purpose of this design is introducing Hangul to non-Korean speakers. It does not cover every single aspect of Hangul, and I do not think people will master Hangul with this wallpaper. However, I believe that they can start reading and writing Hangul with this and that is all I expect.

LaTeX and InDesign: how do they match up?

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Hello everyone,

This week, someone asked me to design a science book, which is all set in LaTeX. I don't have any prior experience with this markup language and I might lack time to learn it comprehensively.

Having gathered some information about the language and downloaded the software at http://www.latex-project.org I'd say that, with respect to typesetting of scientific formulas, LaTeX can be very helpful. But when it comes to over-all book design and typographic details, I'd rather stick to InDesign (CS3, it is).

Is there an easy and reliable way to 'translate' LaTeX-documents into InDesign?

script and language statements in OT features

Forums: 

Trying to learn more about features, focusing on the kerning feature at the moment.

In another post Jens Kutilek kindly offered the following feature as a suggestion to a problem I was trying to solve (http://typophile.com/node/72726):

feature kern {
script grek;
language dflt;
pos space <50 0 100 0>;
} kern;

What I'm wondering about is the script and language statements. I've read about them a bit on Adobe's site but, admittedly, will have to back and revisit to better understand. One thing I didn't see is how these statements get used or activated.

Cyrillic "Identity crisis"

Hi everybody!
I'm from Bulgaria.
Long time I've wanted to discuss the issue of neglected Cyrillic alphabet.

It's a kind of orphan at the moment. It was developed during the Medieval time in the Bulgarian kingdom. Following very close graphical characteristic of Greek alphabet, together with Latin, the new alphabet become third one from the same family. After Bulgaria was conquered from the Ottoman empire the development of this alphabet stopped. It was like that until 18th century, when Peter The Great of Russia decided to make some reforms in it. Some letters were disregarded, others emerged, third received graphical changes.Initially good, this Reform somehow made the gap between similar Greek and Latin grow bigger.

Language Coverage

Wiki Categories: 

Indices : Technical Info : Language Coverage

This article is designed to list which languages are supported by corresponding Unicode blocks. The rule used here to list languages is to list under scripts that have either official status or are still in popular usage, ie. Azerbaijani officially uses the Latin script, but many Azerbaijanis still use Cyrillic extensively.

Latin-1:

Albanian
Danish
Dutch
English
Faroese
Finnish
Flemish
German
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Malay
Norwegian
Portuguese
Scottish Gaelic
Spanish
Swahili
Swedish
Tagalog

Latin Extended-A:*

Afrikaans
Basque
Bosnian
Breton
Catalan
Chichewa
Cornish
Croatian
Czech
Esperanto
Estonian
Fijian
French