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Displaying 1 - 25 of 361 comments.
Font for projection on screen with reverse contrast
Commented on Friday, 17 April 2015 - 7:43am

Using the tag "reverse" at Myfonts https://www.myfonts.com/search/tag%3Areverse/fonts/ produces a fair number of fonts that you might wish to test on screen.
Don

Font for projection on screen with reverse contrast
Commented on Friday, 17 April 2015 - 8:29am

Verdana and Georgia are designed for screen use and have lower cases -- unlike most of the fonts in the reverse tag list above. I don't know if a reverse/negative version is available. The Bodoni on the list has a lower case, but it is very high...

Font identification, thanks
Commented on Thursday, 9 April 2015 - 1:47am

Please post font ID requests to http://typophile.com/typeid
Don

Typeface query
Commented on Thursday, 9 April 2015 - 1:48am

Please post font ID requests to http://typophile.com/typeid
Don

Script Reference Resources?
Commented on Sunday, 5 April 2015 - 1:35am

Very extensive online resource with many samples of a large variety of script styles, the Bowfin Script Guide http://bowfinprintworks.com/ScriptIDGuide.html
Don

Identify font found in University Brochure
Commented on Saturday, 21 March 2015 - 8:38pm

Please post font ID requests to http://typophile.com/typeid
Don

Font from "Archer" on FX
Commented on Friday, 20 March 2015 - 9:26pm

The genre of unstructured bouncy lettering that looks like it was cut from cardboard with an exacto knife, often with a straight or curved ruler, avoiding exact horizontal and vertical; perhaps originated with lettering by Saul Bass in the late 1950s...

Caption pairing for flourishy lettering
Commented on Thursday, 12 March 2015 - 8:05pm

One option would be to echo your Tuscan terminals in a restrained low contrast text typeface such as Zilvertype http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/canadatype/zilvertype-pro/ or Erasmus...

Caption pairing for flourishy lettering
Commented on Thursday, 12 March 2015 - 8:11pm

Or you could simply use a typeface that suggests reliability, integrity and stability, such as Clarendon Text https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/canadatype/clarendon-text/
This...

Caption pairing for flourishy lettering
Commented on Friday, 13 March 2015 - 6:27am

Folowwing up on Riccardo's suggestion "Perhaps a retro-looking contrasted sans?" you might consider Globe Gothic from circa 1900...

Why Garamond is French
Commented on Sunday, 8 March 2015 - 4:26am

One factor is the frequency of capitalized letters, high in German and low in some other languages. A font with a low x-height would seem to work better for continuous text set in the latter group. So Germanic as a high x-height font?
Don

Why Garamond is French
Commented on Sunday, 8 March 2015 - 4:28am

As for scripts, the fonts based on 18th century English penmanship, shout "I am English!"
Don

Why Garamond is French
Commented on Sunday, 8 March 2015 - 10:04am

As for France, my strongest impressions are Pays de Didot and the prevalance of thick and thin sans fonts compared to the Anglosphere. Also, the loose free-form designs Art Nouveau had perhaps wider adoption for French fonts than in most countries....

Why Garamond is French
Commented on Sunday, 8 March 2015 - 12:41pm

Thanks for the reminder. Some nuggets from pp. 187-188:
GarfieldJustMyTypeP187@90pct_4328.jpg">
There is quite a bit more.
Don

Why Garamond is French
Commented on Sunday, 8 March 2015 - 12:48pm

Another short excerpt, from p. 193:
GarfieldJustMyTypeP193@90pct_5406.jpg">
Don

Cultural Imperialism
Commented on Saturday, 28 February 2015 - 4:45pm

I would modify the comment "It's the OT features and general complexity that increase prices" to read "It's the OT features and general complexity that increase costs."
It takes relatively little time to churn out a full set of accents using a...

Cultural Imperialism
Commented on Saturday, 28 February 2015 - 5:07pm

I forgot to mention monopoly power. Does not apply to a font maker. But it does come into play when the providers of web fonts can charge on the basis of measurable usage or on an annual subscription basis. Similar deal as the cable companies that...

Lettering reference help
Commented on Tuesday, 24 February 2015 - 3:38pm

Yes, and this reminds me of the famous read black or white optical illusion:

Don

Iowan Old Style
Commented on Saturday, 7 March 2015 - 7:36am

Unable to get BREAKTTC.EXE to work on Windows Pro 7 64 bit.
Was anyone successful using this OS?
Don

Iowan Old Style
Commented on Saturday, 7 March 2015 - 1:38pm

I didn't use FontForge to do anything other than open the individual files in the .ttc separately and to export new independent files, which I then dealt with in FontLab. Version: 13:48 GMT 22-Feb-2011 (20110222-ML-TtfDb-NoPython) running on Win 7 Pro...

Iowan Old Style
Commented on Saturday, 7 March 2015 - 7:49pm

Thanks. Life is never simple. More work to do here.....
Don

Iowan Old Style
Commented on Thursday, 5 March 2015 - 6:43am

Opening .ttc files: You can also use the free editor Fontforge.
File in .ttc format can contain several individual files. Open them separately and export separate files which can then be dealt with in FontLab, and other font editors.
Don...

Iowan Old Style
Commented on Saturday, 7 March 2015 - 7:25am

FontForge worked fine for me on Windows.
Don

Wide Sans
Commented on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 - 2:51pm

At the risk of oversimplification, I can offer a very short comment:
Most low contrast sans-serif fonts make an optical correction to reduce the thickness of the horizontal strokes compared to the vertical strokes -- which produces the illusion...

Wide Sans
Commented on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 - 3:04pm

For similar optical correction reasons the mid portion of a curved stroke, such as on the bowl of _D_ is thicker than the straight vertical stroke that extends from top to bottom of the the letter.
Again this is something that you can ignore if...